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BMW, IKEA Using AI-Powered Exoskeleton That Adds 66 Pounds Of Lift Force

#artificialintelligence

German Bionic just released the fifth generation Cray X AI-enhanced power suit, or exoskeleton, to help those billions of people with almost 70 pounds of additional lifting capacity, reducing the risk of back injury and repetitive stress injuries. The Cray X is already in use at BMW, IKEA, and the French delivery service DPD, and will be launched internationally in January 2022. The AI-powered suit boosts productivity, reduces error rates, decreases accidents, and results in a 25% reduction in the number of sick days workers take, German Bionic says. The smart exoskeleton market has been estimated to be growing 41.3% a year to a nearly $2 billion industry by 2025, with applications in construction, shipping and receiving, healthcare, and the military. German Bionic CEO Armin Schmidt thinks that within five years this kind of smart exoskeleton capability could help the injured, aged, and disabled to walk, run, or even play sports.


Esko Bionics to bring 'superhero' vest for builders to UK

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Construction workers could soon have a taste of a superhero's strength, thanks to a robotic vest that is designed to prevent injuries on building sites. The futuristic device is a miniature version of an exoskeleton, like the one worn by Iron Man in the Marvel comic's movie franchise. The power suit will allow workers to spend long days lifting materials and holding tools at awkward angles without the associated physical stresses. It could revolutionise the trade according to its creators and prevent ageing bricklayers and others from keeling over on the job. A full body version could also become available for the full Tony Stark experience.


Bionic shorts can boost endurance using using wires to pull legs forward as you run or walk

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A newly-developed pair of smart robotic shorts puts a literal bounce in the wearer's step. In an article published in the journal of Science, researchers from Harvard demonstrate what they call the'hip exosuit' -- a type of smart bionic shorts that boosts the wearer's ability to run and walk. Scientists say that unlike other exoskeletons which focus on increasing strength, the hip exosuit -- which already has a working prototype -- is designed for endurance. Using cables that line the inside of the shorts' legs, the device is able to boost the wearer's movement using the help of an algorithm that discerns their gait. A motor pack in the back then pulls the cables in sync with the wearer's motions and helps propel them forward as they move.


Ford reveals 'Iron Man' exoskeletons used by workers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Robots have replaced many U.S. manufacturing workers, but new mechanical exoskeletons being tested by Ford may help factory workers to function like bionic people, reducing the physical damage of millions of repetitive tasks over many years. The U.S. automaker said on Thursday that workers at two U.S. factories are testing upper-body exoskeletons developed by Richmond, California-based Ekso Bionics Holdings Inc, which are designed to reduce injuries and increase productivity. The four EksoVests were paid for by the United Auto Workers union, which represents hourly workers at Ford, and the automaker plans tests for the exoskeleton in other regions including Europe and South America. Robots have replaced many U.S. manufacturing workers, but new mechanical exoskeletons being tested by Ford Motor Co may help factory workers to function like bionic people, reducing the physical damage of millions of repetitive tasks over many years Construction workers could soon have a taste of a superhero's strength, thanks to a robotic vest that is designed to prevent injuries on building sites. The EksoVest is an upper body exoskeleton, the firm explains.


Exoskeletons Today

Communications of the ACM

The EksoVest supports the wearer's arms during lifting. Millions of people Suffer from the effects of spinal cord injuries and strokes that have left them paralyzed. Millions more suffer from back pain, which makes movement painful. Exoskeletons are helping the paralyzed to walk again, enabling soldiers to carry heavy loads, and workers to lift heavy objects with greater ease. An exoskeleton is a mechanical device or soft material worn by a patient/operator, whose structure mirrors the skeletal structure of the operator's limbs (joints, muscles, etc.).