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Google Is Helping The Pentagon Build AI For Drones

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Google has partnered with the United States Department of Defence to help the agency develop artificial intelligence for analysing drone footage, a move that set off a firestorm among employees of the technology giant when they learned of Google's involvement. Google's pilot project with the Defence Department's Project Maven, an effort to identify objects in drone footage, has not been previously reported, but it was discussed widely within the company last week when information about the project was shared on an internal mailing list, according to sources who asked not to be named because they were not authorised to speak publicly about the project. Some Google employees were outraged that the company would offer resources to the military for surveillance technology involved in drone operations, sources said, while others argued that the project raised important ethical questions about the development and use of machine learning. Google's Eric Schmidt summed up the tech industry's concerns about collaborating with the Pentagon at a talk last spring. "There's a general concern in the tech community of somehow the military-industrial complex using their stuff to kill people incorrectly," he said.


Google Is Helping the Pentagon Build AI for Drones

#artificialintelligence

Google has partnered with the United States Department of Defense to help the agency develop artificial intelligence for analyzing drone footage, a move that set off a firestorm among employees of the technology giant when they learned of Google's involvement. Google's pilot project with the Defense Department's Project Maven, an effort to identify objects in drone footage, has not been previously reported, but it was discussed widely within the company last week when information about the project was shared on an internal mailing list, according to sources who asked not to be named because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the project. Some Google employees were outraged that the company would offer resources to the military for surveillance technology involved in drone operations, sources said, while others argued that the project raised important ethical questions about the development and use of machine learning. Google's Eric Schmidt summed up the tech industry's concerns about collaborating with the Pentagon at a talk last fall. "There's a general concern in the tech community of somehow the military-industrial complex using their stuff to kill people incorrectly," he said.


Chinese facial recognition firm developing AI to predict crimes

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Chinese companies are developing new facial recognition systems that can help law enforcement identify criminals and even potentially predict crimes before they occur, according to a report by Shanghaiist. Equipped with China's photo ID database and the extensive footage taken from public surveillance cameras, the country's facial recognition technologies are able to analyze billions of faces and objects to identify people. China's massive population and lenient privacy laws have made enormous amounts of data available to companies at a low cost to further develop facial recognition software. Wang Shengjin, a professor at Tsinghua University's Department of Electronic Engineering said that while China's primary competitors are other Western tech companies,"[they] are far ahead when it comes to deploying [facial recognition tech] commercially." Due to the fact that Beijing is willing to pay just about anything to ensure national security, quite a few companies are finding the growing industry increasingly profitable.


What is computer vision?

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If I asked you to name the objects in the picture below, you would probably come up with a list of words such as "tablecloth, basket, grass, boy, girl, man, woman, orange juice bottle, tomatoes, lettuce, disposable plates…" without thinking twice. Now, if I told you to describe the picture below, you would probably say, "It's the picture of a family picnic" again without giving it a second thought. Those are two very easy tasks that any person with below-average intelligence and above the age of six or seven could accomplish. However, in the background, a very complicated process takes place. The human vision is a very intricate piece of organic technology that involves our eyes and visual cortex, but also takes into account our mental models of objects, our abstract understanding of concepts and our personal experiences through billions and trillions of interactions we've made with the world in our lives.


NEC unveils AI face recognition

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NEC Corporation has launched a new software program that uses artificial intelligence (AI) in video footage search to quickly identify a person by facial recognition. NeoFace Image Data Mining (Idm) is a new product offering from NEC that can use video footage, for example, data gathered by CCTV cameras, and scan it to accurately identify an individual whose image is captured on camera. It can also be used to search for people who appear at a certain time and place, or who appear with other specified individuals. A complete search for a specific person among one million captured images can be concluded in under 10 seconds. Idm combines existing facial recognition technology with profiling parameters – what NEC refers to as'Profiling Across Spatio-Temporal Data' technology.