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Building a Knowledge Graph for Job Search using BERT Transformer

#artificialintelligence

While the natural language processing (NLP) field has been growing at an exponential rate for the last two years -- thanks to the development of transfer-based models -- their applications have been limited in scope for the job search field. LinkedIn, the leading company in job search and recruitment, is a good example. While I hold a Ph.D. in Material Science and a Master in Physics, I am receiving job recommendations such as Technical Program Manager at MongoDB and a Go Developer position at Toptal which are both web developing companies that are not relevant to my background. This feeling of irrelevancy is shared by many users and is a cause of big frustration. Job seekers should have access to the best tools to help them find the perfect match to their profile without wasting time in irrelevant recommendations and manual searches...


Building a Knowledge Graph for Job Search using BERT Transformer - DataScienceCentral.com

#artificialintelligence

While the natural language processing (NLP) field has been growing at an exponential rate for the last two years -- thanks to the development of transfer-based models -- their applications have been limited in scope for the job search field. LinkedIn, the leading company in job search and recruitment, is a good example. While I hold a Ph.D. in Material Science and a Master in Physics, I am receiving job recommendations such as Technical Program Manager at MongoDB and a Go Developer position at Toptal which are both web developing companies that are not relevant to my background. This feeling of irrelevancy is shared by many users and is a cause of big frustration. In general, however, traditional job search engines are based on simple keyword and/or semantic similarities that are usually not well suited to providing good job recommendations since they don't take into account the interlinks between entities.


The Emerging Impact Of AI On HR

#artificialintelligence

As technology continues to develop at a rapid pace, artificial intelligence (AI) is in the news left and right, inhabiting almost every industry. Perhaps more important, AI is no longer a future concept to work toward -- it's already a mainstay in our workplaces as more and more organizations leverage AI to improve the overall employee experience and business performance. Human Resources, in particular, has become a technologically advanced sector, one that is increasingly streamlined and working smarter. As the founder of a workforce software company, I've seen and worked with a long list of HR departments from a wide range of industries that are at different stages of AI adoption and implementation. I've seen the areas that HR managers are focusing on for considering the use of AI in their departments and also where they might envisage that AI could be a future benefit.


Career advisor systems

AIHub

Career advisor systems are essentially recommender systems in the space of job searching and career advice. They provide recommendations to candidates with possible career paths and to employers with possible candidates for a job opening. In this post we will outline the required capabilities of such systems, and highlight the challenges that need to be overcome in order to construct a working system. Questions like "What is a career advisor system?", "What is it capable of doing?", "Why do we need them?" etc are answered in this article. We also discuss our recent work (presented at AAAI-IAAI [1]) which describes how we proposed to solve this problem.


Skills are the new currency in the changing world of work

#artificialintelligence

By 2025 about 48% of all job opportunities in Europe will need to be filled by people with qualifications beyond high school level. Indeed we don't even need to look so far ahead into the future. Currently, skills among the EU's workforce fall about one-fifth short of what is needed for workers to carry out their jobs at their highest productivity level. A sizeable share of the EU workforce – four in 10 adult employees – feel that their skills are underutilised while about four in 10 EU employers struggle to find the right skills when recruiting[1]. The skills gap has a significant economic impact on both workers and businesses.