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If we can't design autonomous robots, maybe they can design themselves – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Elon Musk's recent announcement of an upcoming Tesla Bot -- complete with a human form, "human-level hands" and a characteristically optimistic delivery date -- has garnered a healthy serving of criticism for good reason. Among other capabilities, Musk says, the robot will eventually be capable of running errands such as going to the grocery store alone. Boston Dynamics, which has developed the most advanced humanoid robot ever created, has spent more than a decade working on its Atlas platform. While progress has been impressive, with Atlas running, jumping and even dancing in front of tens of millions of YouTube viewers, the company is quick to acknowledge that the robot is a long way from performing complex tasks autonomously. One of the best examples of evolutionary robotics potential -- and unfulfilled promise -- goes as far back as 2010 to a study published in the PLOS Biology journal.


If we can't design autonomous robots, maybe they can design themselves – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Elon Musk's recent announcement of an upcoming Tesla Bot -- complete with a human form, "human-level hands" and a characteristically optimistic delivery date -- has garnered a healthy serving of criticism for good reason. Among other capabilities, Musk says, the robot will eventually be capable of running errands such as going to the grocery store alone. Boston Dynamics, which has developed the most advanced humanoid robot ever created, has spent more than a decade working on its Atlas platform. While progress has been impressive, with Atlas running, jumping and even dancing in front of tens of millions of YouTube viewers, the company is quick to acknowledge that the robot is a long way from performing complex tasks autonomously. One of the best examples of evolutionary robotics potential -- and unfulfilled promise -- goes as far back as 2010 to a study published in the PLOS Biology journal.


An evolutionary perspective on immunometabolism

Science

We apply evolutionary and ecological principles of life history to discuss the recent advances in immunometabolism within a unifying framework. From this perspective, we highlight the parallels between cellular and systemic control of metabolism. According to life history theory, biological programs can be broadly divided into growth, reproduction, and maintenance. The choice among these programs is dictated by the quality of the environment. Thus, favorable environments promote growth and reproduction, whereas hostile environments promote maintenance and survival programs.


[Perspective] Visualizing evolution as it happens

Science

One of the greatest symbols of the birth of evolutionary biology is Darwin's first sketch of an evolutionary tree, above which he wrote: "I think." Not only are evolutionary trees central to how scientists conceptualize evolutionary processes, Darwin's words also capture a key aspect of evolutionary science: It is difficult to observe, forcing researchers to rely heavily on inference. In recent decades, studies of fast-growing microorganisms have allowed hypotheses about evolutionary processes to be tested experimentally (1). On page 1147 of this issue, Baym et al. (2) report a device for visualizing evolutionary branching as bacteria grow across a meter-scale agar slab. The results offer important insights into evolutionary dynamics in spatially extended systems.


Love Is An Evolutionary Response To Better Reproduction Rates: Study

International Business Times

Why do we fall in love? This universal feeling of attraction has posed one of the most baffling queries for scientists, who have struggled long to determine the biological purpose of love and why exactly we fall for one and other.