Medtronic acquires AI-powered nutrition platform Nutrino

#artificialintelligence

Medtronic has announced that it will acquire long-time partner Nutrino, an AI powered personalized nutrition platform for an undisclosed sum. As part of the deal Medtronic will be integrating Nutrino's AI-driven personalized insights and food database. The acquisition is set to specifically boost Medtronic's offerings for people living with diabetes and offer the company's predictive glycemic response algorithm, which will be integrated with Medtronic's CGM system. "Bringing Nutrino and their nutrition-related expertise into our organization will give us a substantial differentiator in the diabetes industry and accelerate our progress to help people with diabetes live with greater freedom and better health," Hooman Hakami, executive vice president and president of the Diabetes Group at Medtronic, said in a statement. "The Nutrino team has been an outstanding partner over the past few years. We are excited to welcome them to our team, and I have no doubt that, together, we will make a profound impact on the lives of people with diabetes."


Large Companies Eye Collaboration as Entry into AI

#artificialintelligence

Edwards Lifesciences is delving deeper into the realm of artificial intelligence through a partnership with San Francisco-based Bay Labs. The goal of the collaboration, which has multiple initiatives is to improve the detection of heart disease. Some of the initiatives include, the development of new AI-powered algorithms in Bay Labs' EchoMD measurement and interpretation software suite; support for ongoing clinical studies at institutions; and the integration of EchoMD algorithms into Edwards Lifesciences' CardioCare quality care navigation platform. Irvine, CA-based Edwards' CardioCare program combines clinical consulting expertise with a cloud-based platform to facilitate in the identification, referral, and care pathway management of patients with structural heart disease. CardioCare can help hospitals improve quality by reducing variability in echocardiography and ensure effective communication between care settings to ensure patients access to care.


Sugar.IQWatson Artificial Intelligence (AI) Helping People with Diabetes

#artificialintelligence

New mobile app from Medtronic, Sugar.IQ, applies AI technology from IBM Watson Health to help people with diabetes make more informed decisions. Self-driving cars may not be here yet, but artificial intelligence is being used today to help patients with diabetes to manage their glucose. IBM announced its advancement in using artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and analytic technologies to address the data-driven obstacles of diabetes, as presented at the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) 78th Scientific Sessions. Through IBM Watson Health's ongoing partnership with Medtronic, the companies announced the commercial availability of Sugar.IQ with Watson, an app that aims to give people insights to help manage their diabetes. They also announced findings from three data presentations at ADA, including real-world data underscoring the value of machine learning and analytic tools in diabetes.


Dietary fat: From foe to friend?

Science

For decades, dietary advice was based on the premise that high intakes of fat cause obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and possibly cancer. Recently, evidence for the adverse metabolic effects of processed carbohydrate has led to a resurgence in interest in lower-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets with high fat content. However, some argue that the relative quantity of dietary fat and carbohydrate has little relevance to health and that focus should instead be placed on which particular fat or carbohydrate sources are consumed. This review, by nutrition scientists with widely varying perspectives, summarizes existing evidence to identify areas of broad consensus amid ongoing controversy regarding macronutrients and chronic disease. A report by the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs in 1977 called on Americans to reduce consumption of total and saturated fat, increase carbohydrate intake, and lower calorie intake, among other dietary goals (1). This report, by elected members of Congress with little scientific training, was written against a backdrop of growing public concern about diet-related chronic disease, precipitated in part by attention surrounding President Eisenhower's heart attack in 1955. Even then, the recommendations were hotly debated. The American Medical Association stated that "The evidence for assuming benefits to be derived from the adoption of such universal dietary goals as set forth in the report is not conclusive … [with] potential for harmful effects." Indeed, the lack of scientific consensus was reflected in the voluminous, 869-page "Supplemental Views" published contemporaneously by the committee. Nonetheless, reduction in fat consumption soon became a central principle of dietary guidelines from the U.S. government and virtually all nutrition- and health-related professional organizations. The Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health in 1988 identified reduction of fat consumption as the "primary dietary priority," with sugar consumption only a secondary concern for children at risk for dental caries (3).


Novo Nordisk and Medtronic Team on Diabetes Data Management and Delivery Systems BioSpace

#artificialintelligence

Medical device maker Medtronic and Novo Nordisk have entered a collaboration pact to develop ways of integrating insulin dosing management data from future Novo Nordisk smart insulin pens into Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) devices from Medtronic. Novo Nordisk plans to launch the NovoPen 6 and NovoPen Echo, durable smart insulin pens, along with disposable, pre-filled injection solutions, in 2020. These smart insulin pens will be compatible with both Android and iOS devices. The collaboration, which is non-exclusive, will allow them to be compatible with Medtronic CGM, such as the Guardian Connect system. In addition to being able to better track and manage blood glucose levels, healthcare professionals and caregivers, with permission from the patient, can automatically track glucose monitoring and insulin dosing data in a single location.