Goto

Collaborating Authors

DeepHealth: Deep Learning for Health Informatics

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine learning and deep learning have provided us with an exploration of a whole new research era. As more data and better computational power become available, they have been implemented in various fields. The demand for artificial intelligence in the field of health informatics is also increasing and we can expect to see the potential benefits of artificial intelligence applications in healthcare. Deep learning can help clinicians diagnose disease, identify cancer sites, identify drug effects for each patient, understand the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes, explore new phenotypes, and predict infectious disease outbreaks with high accuracy. In contrast to traditional models, its approach does not require domain-specific data pre-process, and it is expected that it will ultimately change human life a lot in the future. Despite its notable advantages, there are some challenges on data (high dimensionality, heterogeneity, time dependency, sparsity, irregularity, lack of label) and model (reliability, interpretability, feasibility, security, scalability) for practical use. This article presents a comprehensive review of research applying deep learning in health informatics with a focus on the last five years in the fields of medical imaging, electronic health records, genomics, sensing, and online communication health, as well as challenges and promising directions for future research. We highlight ongoing popular approaches' research and identify several challenges in building deep learning models.


Industry News

#artificialintelligence

Find here a listing of the latest industry news in genomics, genetics, precision medicine, and beyond. Updates are provided on a monthly basis. Sign-Up for our newsletter and never miss out on the latest news and updates. As 2019 came to an end, Veritas Genetics struggled to get funding due to concerns it had previously taken money from China. It was forced to cease US operations and is in talks with potential buyers. The GenomeAsia 100K Project announced its pilot phase with hopes to tackle the underrepresentation of non-Europeans in human genetic studies and enable genetic discoveries across Asia. Veritas Genetics, the start-up that can sequence a human genome for less than $600, ceases US operations and is in talks with potential buyers Veritas Genetics ceases US operations but will continue Veritas Europe and Latin America. It had trouble raising funding due to previous China investments and is looking to be acquired. Illumina loses DNA sequencing patents The European Patent ...


Towards automated symptoms assessment in mental health

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Activity and motion analysis has the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool for mental disorders. However, to-date, little work has been performed in turning stratification measures of activity into useful symptom markers. The research presented in this thesis has focused on the identification of objective activity and behaviour metrics that could be useful for the analysis of mental health symptoms in the above mentioned dimensions. Particular attention is given to the analysis of objective differences between disorders, as well as identification of clinical episodes of mania and depression in bipolar patients, and deterioration in borderline personality disorder patients. A principled framework is proposed for mHealth monitoring of psychiatric patients, based on measurable changes in behaviour, represented in physical activity time series, collected via mobile and wearable devices. The framework defines methods for direct computational analysis of symptoms in disorganisation and psychomotor dimensions, as well as measures for indirect assessment of mood, using patterns of physical activity, sleep and circadian rhythms. The approach of computational behaviour analysis, proposed in this thesis, has the potential for early identification of clinical deterioration in ambulatory patients, and allows for the specification of distinct and measurable behavioural phenotypes, thus enabling better understanding and treatment of mental disorders.


Machine learning in resting-state fMRI analysis

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine learning techniques have gained prominence for the analysis of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rsfMRI) data. Here, we present an overview of various unsupervised and supervised machine learning applicationsto rsfMRI. We present a methodical taxonomy of machine learning methods in resting-state fMRI. We identify three major divisions of unsupervised learning methods with regard to their applications to rsfMRI, based on whether they discover principal modes of variation across space, time or population. Next, we survey the algorithms and rsfMRI feature representations that have driven the success of supervised subject-level predictions. Thegoal is to provide a high-level overview of the burgeoning field of rsfMRI from the perspective of machine learning applications. Keywords: Machine learning, resting-state, functional MRI, intrinsic networks, brain connectivity 1. Introduction Resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) is a widely used neuroimaging tool that ...


Cure For Dementia? Umbilical Cord Blood Revitalizes Brain Function, Study Finds

International Business Times

It turns out the young have something else the elderly do not after a scientific finding, which sounds like something out of a vampire fable, was published by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. The research, which was first published in Nature Wednesday, revealed that a protein found in umbilical cord blood from human newborns is a protein that disappears as we grow older. Researchers revealed that injecting cord blood into older mice could actually help to restore brain function. The study's findings were taken from trials with mice and revealed that the plasma of younger mice had neurological benefits on older mice, who were said to have performed better on memory tests and learning tests. "Neuroscientists have ignored it and are still ignoring it, but to me it's remarkable that something in your blood can influence the way you think," Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, professor of neurology and neurological sciences and the study's senior author, said.