Cure For Dementia? Umbilical Cord Blood Revitalizes Brain Function, Study Finds

International Business Times

It turns out the young have something else the elderly do not after a scientific finding, which sounds like something out of a vampire fable, was published by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine. The research, which was first published in Nature Wednesday, revealed that a protein found in umbilical cord blood from human newborns is a protein that disappears as we grow older. Researchers revealed that injecting cord blood into older mice could actually help to restore brain function. The study's findings were taken from trials with mice and revealed that the plasma of younger mice had neurological benefits on older mice, who were said to have performed better on memory tests and learning tests. "Neuroscientists have ignored it and are still ignoring it, but to me it's remarkable that something in your blood can influence the way you think," Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, professor of neurology and neurological sciences and the study's senior author, said.


Kyoto University performs world's first iPS cell transplant for Parkinson's

The Japan Times

KYOTO – Kyoto University said Friday it has conducted the world's first transplant of induced pluripotent stem cells to treat Parkinson's disease. Nerve cells created from the artificially derived stem cells, known as iPS cells, were transplanted into the brain of a patient in his 50s in October in a treatment researchers hope to develop into a method that can be covered under Japan's health insurance system. "By also cooperating with companies, we want to develop a mass production system that enables us to deliver nerve cells derived from iPS cells to all over the world," said Jun Takahashi, a professor at the university's Center for iPS Cell Research and Application who led the research team, at a news conference. Parkinson's disease reduces dopamine-producing neurons in the brain and results in tremors in the hands and feet and stiffness in the body. While there are treatments to relieve the symptoms, there is currently no cure for the disease.


3 Surprising Things Linked To Poor Brain Function

International Business Times

Sleep is a good indicator of our overall health and well-being. Seven to nine hours of sleepis recommended to feel truly rested, but oversleeping on a regular basis could signal problems with our brain health. A study published in Neurology found people who consistently sleep more than nine hours a night are more likely to develop dementia accompanied by smaller brain volume, and poor executive function. "Participants without a high school degree who sleep for more than 9 hours each night had six times the risk of developing dementia in 10 years as compared to participants who slept for less," said Dr. Sudha Seshadri, corresponding study author, and professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine Alzheimer's Disease Center (BUSM) and Framingham Heart Study (FSH) senior investigator, in a statement. Previous research suggests both too little sleep and too much sleep are linked to dementia.


Scientists endorse these three strategies to delay dementia

PBS NewsHour

WOLFRATSHAUSEN, GERMANY – NOVEMBER 15: Two female inhabitants of a residential care home for Alzheimer's disease and dementia patients walk hand-in-hand in the corridor of the residential home on November 15, 2011 in Wolfratshausen, Germany. In a landmark report, scientists have endorsed three strategies for preventing dementia and cognitive decline associated with normal aging -- being physically active, engaging in cognitive training and controlling high blood pressure. This is the first time experts convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine have deemed scientific evidence strong enough to suggest that preventing dementia and age-related cognitive decline might be possible. Seven years ago, in a separate report issued by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, scientists said they couldn't recommend any interventions to forestall or slow cognitive deterioration because state-of-the-art science at that time didn't offer enough support. Now there's a considerably larger body of research to draw upon.


Is Need for More Sleep a Sign of Pending Dementia?

#artificialintelligence

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who begin sleeping more than nine hours a night may face a higher risk of dementia down the road, a new study suggests. The researchers estimated that the risk of dementia grew by almost 2.5 times for those who found themselves recently needing extra sleep. The chances of dementia rose sixfold for people without a high school degree who suddenly needed to sleep nine hours or more, the study contended. The study authors said this finding hinted that education might somehow offer a bit of protection from dementia. People with dementia often suffer from disrupted sleep, "but we don't know much about whether these changes come first," said study co-author Matthew Pase.