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Low-key Trump intro for 'my partner,' running mate Pence

Associated Press

Mike Pence, R-Ind., during a campaign event to announce Pence as the vice presidential running mate on, Saturday, July 16, 2016, in New York. In their first joint appearance, Trump tried to draw a sharp contrast between Pence, a soft-spoken conservative, and Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential candidate. Mike Pence, R-Ind., during a campaign event to announce Pence as the vice presidential running mate on, Saturday, July 16, 2016, in New York. In their first joint appearance, Trump tried to draw a sharp contrast between Pence, a soft-spoken conservative, and Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential candidate.


Trump nears VP decision, candidates on standby for decision

Associated Press

In this photo taken July 11, 2016, Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump listens to a question during an interview in Virginia Beach, Va. In a summer of political and racial tumult, young Americans are in a dour mood: pessimistic about the fairness of the economic system, questioning the greatness of the U.S. and wondering about the effectiveness of how the nation picks its leaders. In this photo taken July 11, 2016, Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump listens to a question during an interview in Virginia Beach, Va. In a summer of political and racial tumult, young Americans are in a dour mood: pessimistic about the fairness of the economic system, questioning the greatness of the U.S. and wondering about the effectiveness of how the nation picks its leaders.


Whatever doesn't kill Trump only makes him stronger

Los Angeles Times

One year ago, Republican Donald Trump beat Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential contest, defying the expectations of just about everyone who'd been paying attention. Los Angeles Times Opinion asked liberals, moderates and conservatives, political observers and politicians to consider What Happened (also the title of Clinton's latest memoir) and reflect on the nature of the Trump presidency to date. Whatever doesn't kill Trump only makes him stronger Donald Trump presides as he campaigned. He is proving a Nietzschean figure in the sense that "what does not kill him makes him stronger." Each time the media, Republican enemies and the Democratic opposition seem to have Trump on the ropes, the president emerges far less wounded than his critics.


Trump presents 'partner' Pence, but no doubt who's the star

Associated Press

Mike Pence, R-Ind., left, during a campaign event to announce Pence as the vice presidential running mate on, Saturday, July 16, 2016, in New York. Mike Pence, R-Ind., left, during a campaign event to announce Pence as the vice presidential running mate on, Saturday, July 16, 2016, in New York. Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump picked Pence as his running mate. NEW YORK (AP) -- Donald Trump presented running mate Mike Pence to the nation Saturday, hailing the Indiana governor as his "first choice" and "my partner in the campaign."


Hillary Clinton picked Tim Kaine to emphasize her message that she's the responsible choice, not Trump

Los Angeles Times

In another election, Hillary Clinton might have been tempted to choose a different kind of running mate. She could have fired up the party base with a staunch progressive, or reinforced her own historic candidacy with another woman or a Latino. But this is no ordinary year. And Clinton's choice of Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine reflects how she is running against Donald Trump: Kaine will help her emphasize that she is the responsible candidate who belongs in the Oval Office, not the billionaire real estate magnate and reality TV star. The Clinton-Kaine ticket will debut publicly Saturday here in Miami, two days before the start of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.