Why China Is Key to the Future of Virtual Reality

TIME - Tech

I was in Shenzhen, China last week at the first CE China trade show, which was produced by IFA, the German company that also produces the giant IFA CE trade show in Berlin each September. Shenzhen, which has a population of over 10 million people, is about an hour's drive from Hong Kong. The city is best known as the place where Foxconn and other factories build consumer products, including the Apple iPhone and iPad, and is often called the "Silicon Valley" of China. I wanted to attend the IFA China CE Show to specifically to see how the Chinese were going to apply their manufacturing magic to virtual reality (VR) headsets, and to see if they could bring prices down and get new VR headsets out that had broader appeal to mass consumer audiences any time soon. What I found is that the Chinese have really gone to town on making better mobile headsets, which use a smartphone to power a rudimentary VR experience.


Study Confirms 'Mario Kart' Really Does Make You A Better Driver

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

For their study, researchers from New York University Shanghai and University of Hong Kong had 80 students and faculty from the University of Hong Kong participate in several experiments involving different video games. Action-based video games, for example, force the gamer to respond to visual cues. Think driving-centric games, like "Mario Kart," or first-person shooter games, such as "Unreal Tournament." Non-action games, on the other hand, include those like "Sims 2" and "Roller Coaster Tycoon," where the gamer is responsible for directing the action. In one experiment, subjects with no action-based video game experience were asked to played "Mario Kart" or a first-person shooter game.


Chinese AI team plans to challenge Google's AlphaGo at board game

#artificialintelligence

BEIJING (By Paul Carsten, Reuters) – A team from China plans to challenge Google's AlphaGo, the artificial intelligence (AI) program that beat a world-class player in the ancient board game Go, the state-owned Shanghai Securities News reported on Thursday. Scientists from the China Computer Go team will issue a challenge to AlphaGo by the end of 2016, said attendees at an event in Beijing organized by the Chinese Go Association and the Chinese Association for Artificial Intelligence, according to the report. It did not elaborate on the nature of the challenge. The event was'The Forum for Understanding the AlphaGo War between Man and Machine and Chinese Artificial Intelligence', Shanghai Securities News reported on its website. AlphaGo, developed by Google subsidiary DeepMind, shocked audiences when it beat South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol in Seoul earlier this month.


Chinese AI team plans to challenge Google's AlphaGo: state media

#artificialintelligence

BEIJING (Reuters) - A team from China plans to challenge Google's AlphaGo, the artificial intelligence (AI) program that beat a world-class player in the ancient board game Go, the state-owned Shanghai Securities News reported on Thursday. Scientists from the China Computer Go team will issue a challenge to AlphaGo by the end of 2016, said attendees at an event in Beijing organized by the Chinese Go Association and the Chinese Association for Artificial Intelligence, according to the report. It did not elaborate on the nature of the challenge. The event was'The Forum for Understanding the AlphaGo War between Man and Machine and Chinese Artificial Intelligence', Shanghai Securities News reported on its website. AlphaGo, developed by Google subsidiary DeepMind, shocked audiences when it beat South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol in Seoul earlier this month.


Game on for Boston E-sports

Boston Herald

Years from now, the drama that has gripped local sports fans as the Celtics wooed big-name free agents to come play in the Hub may involve the e-sports stars of the future and a Boston-based team jockeying to sign them to their squad. A new Boston team of top-tier gamers owned by New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft will soon be competing in a new Overwatch league, according to ESPN. Along with Kraft, other teams based in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Shanghai, and Seoul, South Korea, have committed to the league. Sterling Equities, which owns the New York Mets, will field a squad. Although e-sports remains relatively niche, signs of growth have attracted traditional sports giants like ESPN and the NBA to launch ventures.