EU air traffic control agency warns of flights over Syria

Al Jazeera

The international air traffic control agency Eurocontrol has warned airlines to exercise caution in the eastern Mediterranean due to the possible launch of air strikes into Syria in the next 72 hours. Eurocontrol said that air-to-ground and/or cruise missiles could be used within that period and there was a possibility of intermittent disruption of radio navigation equipment. US President Donald Trump and Western allies are discussing possible military action after they blamed Syria's President Bashar al-Assad for a suspected poison gas attack on Saturday on a rebel-held town that long had held out against government forces. Trump on Tuesday cancelled a planned trip to Latin America later this week to focus instead on responding to the Syria incident, the White House said. Trump had on Monday warned of a quick, forceful response once responsibility for the Syria attack was established.


Accused Russian hacker extradited to U.S. to face charges he attacked Dropbox, LinkedIn

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

An Associated Press investigation finds that Russian cyber spies exploiting a national vulnerability in cybersecurity are trying to break into the emails of scores of people working on military drone technology. An accused Russian hacker blamed for attacking LinkedIn, Dropbox and Formspring is finally facing American prosecutors after a lengthy extradition fight in the Czech Republic. Yevgeniy Aleksandrovich Nikulin is due to appear in U.S. federal court in California on Thursday for a detention hearing. It's unclear whether Nikulin has any connection to the Russian troll farm the Internet Research Agency, which is widely blamed by American authorities for interfering in the 2016 presidential election. But only two days after Nikulin's arrest, American officials for the first time publicly warned that the Russian government was directing efforts to influence the election by hacking and releasing private information.


Canadian air traffic controllers send pizza to U.S. colleagues working without pay

Mashable

That includes air traffic controllers, like those working in the New York Air Traffic Control Center, who, while they're still waiting for their paychecks, received a tasty symbol of solidarity from their colleagues across the Canadian border. SEE ALSO: Jimmy Kimmel gives federal employees work during Trump's shutdown Canadian air traffic controllers from the Atlantic province towns of Gander and Moncton ordered pizzas for the crew working at the control center in Ronkonkoma, Long Island on Friday, according to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). Pointed out by the news outlet, a notice was posted up in the hallway of the centre heralding the arrival of 32 pies courtesy of the Canadian Air Traffic Controller Association (CATCA). An image of the notice was posted to Reddit by David Lombardo, a former air traffic controller at the Long Island center, and was posted by other employees on Twitter. Thank you to @CATCA5454 for your generosity!


Iranians charged with cyberattacks on US banks, New York dam

ZDNet

A grand jury indicted the seven alleged cyberattackers, who had links to the Iranian government, for an "extensive campaign" which lasted just shy of six months. During their campaign, they are said to have carried out numerous distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, with one of the attackers separately gaining unauthorized access to a dam's industrial automation control (SCADA) system. The seven men are accused of disabling bank websites, preventing customers from gaining access to their online accounts, and costing the companies "tens of millions of dollars in remediation costs" in fending off the attacks in various incidents spanning 2011 to 2013. Court papers say Bank of America, Capital One, ING, PNC Banks, and the New York Stock Exchange were targets. One of the men charged, Hamid Firoozi, was indicted on a separate count of hacking into a system the Bowman Dam in New York, which according to the Justice Dept.


Hope You Like National Parks Feces and Diarrhea Lettuce Because the Shutdown Is Lasting Until at Least Monday

Slate

Good news (for infectious diseases): With the Senate adjourned for the weekend, the partial government shutdown is guaranteed to last until Monday and become the longest in U.S. history. That means, among other things, that human waste is going to continue to pile up in unattended national park bathrooms and that the Food and Drug Administration is going to continue to cancel inspections of "high-risk" foods, including fresh fruit and vegetables. I mean, this is just not a sentence you want to read about your nation's fish: Some public health experts were worried about the impact of the shutdown on inspection of fish. To be clear, there are no active lettuce outbreaks going on right now, and even under normal operations high-risk facilities are only inspected once every three years. So the odds that the shutdown has already poisoned your intestines are low.