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Demand for emotional intelligence skills soars six fold in response to the rise of AI and automation

#artificialintelligence

Paris, October 17, 2019 – As new technologies automate more traditional and routine tasks, executives and employees recognise that emotional intelligence (EI) skills – such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management – will be a key requisite for success in the years to come. While demand for EI skills is set to increase by six times in the next 3-5 years, recruitment and training in this area has mostly failed to adapt. This is set to leave many companies unable to reap the benefits EI offers in terms of employee satisfaction, revenue generation, lower attrition and cost reductions. The "Emotional intelligence – the essential skillset for the age of AI" report from the Capgemini Research Institute provides a global look at how companies view EI and recommends that they combine technology with talent to develop relevant skills among their employees. As more traditional and routine tasks become automated, organisations are placing a premium on EI skills, from self-awareness to relationship management and communication.


Demand for emotional intelligence skills soars six folds

#artificialintelligence

As new technologies automate more traditional and routine tasks, executives and employees recognize that emotional intelligence (EI) skills – such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management – will be a key requisite for success in the years to come. While demand for EI skills is set to increase by six times in the next 3-5 years, recruitment and training in this area has mostly failed to adapt. This is set to leave many companies unable to reap the benefits EI offers in terms of employee satisfaction, revenue generation, lower attrition and cost reductions. The "Emotional intelligence – the essential skillset for the age of AI" report from the Capgemini Research Institute provides a global look at how companies view EI and recommends that they combine technology with the talent to develop relevant skills among their employees. Executives said employees need to develop EI skills so they can adapt to more client/person-facing roles (76%) and take on tasks requiring EI skills that cannot be automated (also 76%) such as empathy, influence and teamwork.


Meeting the challenge of automation with soft skills

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Intelligent software is replacing humans doing repetitive and routine machine-focused jobs such as switchboard operators, front-desk hotel assistants, typists, manufacturing production and packaging operatives. We are even starting to see robots take and deliver orders at restaurants, provide banking assistance, serve coffee and drive cars. Increasingly, artificial intelligence (AI) is encroaching into knowledge worker roles. In the legal sector, AI is carrying out routine contract review work. In the financial and insurance sectors, intelligent apps are creating new business models that replace many of the activities of sales representatives, by cross-selling to consumers through the app, for example.


Closing the employability skills gap

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Most organizations are well aware of what economists are calling the Fourth Industrial Revolution1 and what it could mean for the future of work.2 Up to an estimated 47 percent of US jobs face potential automation over the next 20 years, driven primarily by rapid advances in AI, cognitive computing, and automation of repetitive, rule-based tasks.3 Other disruptive forces seem to be shaping the future of work as well--many organizations are shifting to more team-based structures; workplaces are increasingly virtual, flexible, and geographically agnostic; the overall workforce is becoming more diverse, multigenerational, and dispersed; and most careers are morphing from following predictable road maps to constant reinvention. In the face of this, various leaders across industries are reimagining their workforce models to explore how they can use technology, expanded work settings, and alternative talent to address these disruptive forces. In addition, many are reevaluating their talent profiles, including how they measure the skill sets required for success in the future.


Josh Bersin: Surprise! The skills of the future aren't technical HRExecutive.com

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The IBM Institute for Business Value recently surveyed approximately 5,670 executives across 48 countries to learn more about the skills needed to execute business strategies. The top finding of the research is that approximately 120 million workers may need to be retrained or reskilled as a result of AI and intelligent automation. Yet, the research also revealed that, while technical and digital skills were still in high demand, executives are placing highest priority on behavioral--or soft--skills. A bit further down the list was: the capacity for innovation and creativity; and ethics and integrity. See also: Are soft skills more important than the right qualifications?