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To find a job, play these games

Engadget

I am trying to fill animated balloons with water without them bursting. I watch my laptop screen with laser focus, rapping the space bar as soon as a green dot appears. I weigh how much money to trade with an imaginary partner in a scenario akin to the prisoner's dilemma. This is all in service of finding me a job. It hasn't just been me.


Consumer-goods giant Unilever has been hiring employees using brain games and artificial intelligence -- and it's a huge success

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Unilever wants to be a global leader when it comes to using artificial intelligence for hiring. For the past year, the Dutch-British consumer-goods giant Unilever has been using artificial intelligence to hire entry-level employees, and the company says it has dramatically increased diversity and cost-efficiency. "We were going to campus the same way I was recruited over 20 years ago," Mike Clementi, VP of human resources for North America, told Business Insider. "Inherently, something didn't feel right." Unilever is one of the world's leading consumer-goods conglomerates, with billion-dollar brands like Axe, Dove, and Lipton, and it has 170,000 employees worldwide.


Pymetrics attacks discrimination in hiring with AI and recruiting games

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Identify the traits of your top performing employees and hire people like them, but without the discrimanatory bias of traditional recruiting. That's the promise of Pymetrics, an artificial intelligence startup that today announced $8 million in new funding onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt SF. Pymetrics' goal is "making the world a fairer place" by dismantling hiring discrimination like sexism, racism, ageism and classism. Anyone can play the Pymetrics test games and get scored on different hireable traits, plus see suggestions for job types they'd be great at. You can watch my interview with Pymetrics' CEO Frida Polli below: A company's all-star employees play Pymetrics' set of games that assess things like memory, emotion detection, risk-taking, fairness and focus.


Consumer goods giant Unilever has been hiring employees using brain games and artificial intelligence - and it's a huge success

#artificialintelligence

Unilever wants to be a global leader when it comes to using artificial intelligence for hiring. For the past year, Dutch-British consumer goods giant Unilever has been using artificial intelligence to hire entry-level employees, and the company says that it has dramatically increased diversity and cost efficiency. "We were going to campus the same way I was recruited over 20 years ago," Mike Clementi, VP of human resources for North America, told Business Insider. "Inherently something didn't feel right." Unilever is one of the world's leading consumer goods conglomerates, with billion-dollar brands like Axe, Dove, and Lipton, and has 170,000 employees worldwide.


Moneyball for business: How AI is changing talent management

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The online games were easy–until I got to challenge number six. I was applying for a job at Unilever, the consumer-goods behemoth behind Axe Body Spray and Hellmann's Real Mayonnaise. I was halfway through a series of puzzles designed to test 90 cognitive and emotional traits, everything from my memory and planning speed to my focus and appetite for risk. A machine had already scrutinized my application to determine whether I was fit to reach even this test-taking stage. Now, as I sat at my laptop, scratching my head over a probability game that involved wagering varying amounts of virtual money on whether I could hit my space bar five times within three seconds or 60 times within 12 seconds, an algorithm custom-built for Unilever analyzed my every click. I furiously stabbed at my keyboard, my chances of joining one of the world's largest employers literally at my fingertips.