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IBM targets x86 server territory with new Power servers

PCWorld

IBM sold off its x86 server business two years ago to Lenovo, thinking it was exiting a cut-throat, low-margin business. But the cloud has only intensified x86 server chip sales, and IBM is paying attention. The company is adapting a new range of Power servers -- which typically run powerful systems -- for the cloud. The Power E870C and E880C servers, announced Monday, are flexible in handling many tasks and can scale for distributed computing and cloud integration. The new servers, which support Ubuntu Linux and Unix, sound similar to x86 servers powering internal and external clouds at companies like Facebook, Microsoft, and Amazon.


Backdoor Found in Utility for Linux, Unix Servers

#artificialintelligence

In an unnerving twist, when a critical zero-day vulnerability was reported in a Unix administration tool, called Webmin, it was revealed the flaw was no accident. According to researchers, the vulnerability was a secret backdoor planted in the popular utility nearly a year before its discovery. The backdoor gave anyone with knowledge of its existence the ability to execute commands as root, meaning an attacker could take control of the targeted endpoint. According to Jamie Cameron, the author of Webmin, the bogus version was 1.890. Two additional versions were found with near identical backdoor code, version 1.900 and 1.920.


Red Hat Enterprise Linux for ARM arrives after seven years of development

ZDNet

A chapel in the heart of Barcelona Univesity is home to one of Europe's most powerful supercomputers - and a mobile chip-based successor is under development. For years, we've wanted ARM servers. Even Microsoft has thrown its server hat in the ARM ring. Now, Red Hat has moved this from an idea to a shipping product: RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for ARM. RHEL for ARM has a RHEL 7.4 user space with the 4.11 Linux kernel.


How to have a Linux home server on the cheap

PCWorld

Ask any Linux enthusiast, and they'll tell you how awesome an operating system Linux can be. For the desktop user, the freedom from worry about most viruses is a big plus, and not spending $100 upgrading Windows is a big plus too. As awesome as Linux is for desktop use, Linux (and BSD for that matter) truly shines as a server. While providing web-based services is one of those server-y things Linux does really well, Linux can do a lot more than host a blog about family outings. If you're looking to host your own services instead of paying for or relying on those in the cloud, running your own home server is one of the best ways to keep your files private.


CentOS 7 Linux Server Cookbook, 2nd Edition - Programmer Books

#artificialintelligence

This book will provide you with a comprehensive series of starting points that will give you direct access to the inner workings of the latest CentOS version 7 and help you trim the learning curve to master your server. You will begin with the installation and basic configuration of CentOS 7, followed by learning how to manage your system, services and software packages. You will then gain an understanding of how to administer the file system, secure access to your server and configure various resource sharing services such as file, printer and DHCP servers across your network. Further on, we cover advanced topics such as FTP services, building your own DNS server, running database servers, and providing mail and web services. Finally, you will get a deep understanding of SELinux and you will learn how to work with Docker operating-system virtualization and how to monitor your IT infrastructure with Nagios.