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How Artificial Intelligence Is Accelerating Life Sciences

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The drug development lifecycle is long and fraught with heavy risk -- it takes a staggering 10 – 15 years on average, with ultimately only 12 percent of drugs in clinical trials gaining approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) [1]. To put this in perspective, 22.7 percent of all global research and development spending in 2017 was in the healthcare industry, second only to 23.1 percent spent in the computing and electronics industry, yet the product lifecycle is longer, and costs are much higher [2]. For example, the original iPhone took two and a half years to develop from concept to launch, and an estimated $150 million spent in research and development [3]. In contrast, the average cost of new drug and biologics is $2.87 billion when factoring in the post-approval research and development costs, according to figures released in May 2016 by The Tufts Center for the Study of Drug development (CSDD) [4]. For pharmaceutical companies that have launched more than four drugs, the median cost is closer to a staggering $5.3 billion according to analysis by industry expert Matthew Herper of Forbes [5].


How Artificial Intelligence Is Accelerating Life Sciences

#artificialintelligence

The drug development lifecycle is long and fraught with heavy risk -- it takes a staggering 10 – 15 years on average, with ultimately only 12 percent of drugs in clinical trials gaining approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) [1]. To put this in perspective, 22.7 percent of all global research and development spending in 2017 was in the healthcare industry, second only to 23.1 percent spent in the computing and electronics industry, yet the product lifecycle and cost are much higher [2]. For example, the original iPhone took two and a half years to develop from concept to launch, and an estimated $150 million spent in research and development [3]. In contrast, the average cost of new drug and biologics is $2.87 billion when factoring in the post-approval research and development costs, according to figures released in May 2016 by The Tufts Center for the Study of Drug development (CSDD) [4]. For pharmaceutical companies that have launched more than four drugs, the median cost is closer to a staggering $5.3 billion according to analysis by industry expert Matthew Herper of Forbes [5].


Artificial Intelligence in Preclinical Design and Execution: Investors and Startups

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The growing demand for ML/AI technologies, as well as for ML/AI talent, in the pharmaceutical industry is driving the formation of a new interdisciplinary field: data-driven drug discovery/healthcare. Consequently, there is a growing number of AI driven startups offering technology solutions for drug discovery/development. In drug development, preclinical phase (in vitro and in vivo), also named preclinical studies and nonclinical studies, is a stage of research that begins before clinical trials, and during which important feasibility, iterative testing and drug safety data are collected. According to a detailed mind-map prepared by Pharma Division of Deep Knowledge Analytics (updated Q1 2019): the AI for Drug Discovery, Biomarker Development and Advanced R&D Industry Landscape counts so far 400 investors, 170 companies and 50 corporations. This article focuses only on the AI startups and the AI investors trying to overcome the above 4 challenges during design and execution of the preclinical phase.


9 Computational Drug Discovery Startups Using AI - Nanalyze

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Recently we talked before how big data is the new frontier with just .05% of all data available today having been analyzed. This means that all kinds of gold prospectors are lining up with their freshly crafted artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms looking to extract all the value they can from this wild west of data before someone else does. Perhaps nowhere is there more excitement at the moment than the applications to be had in the healthcare industry. Here's a look at just some of the startups that are applying artificial intelligence and big data to healthcare (courtesy of the bright minds over at CB Insights): The application that we've circled above is "drug discovery" using AI or what's also known as "computational drug discovery". The reason that this is now a thing is not just because of all the big data that's available now, but also because of how cheap cloud computing has become, not to mention the emergence of deep learning algorithms.


Startups Disrupting Healthcare with AI and Machine Learning

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Increasingly crowded imaging & diagnostics: 17 out of the 22 companies under imagining & diagnostics raised their first equity funding round since January 2015 (this includes 1st Seed or Series A rounds, as well as a first round raised by stealth startup Imagen Technologies). In 2014, Butterfly Networks raised a $100M Series C, backed by Aeris Capital and Stanford University. This was the third-largest equity round to AI in healthcare companies, after China-based iCarbonX's $154M mega-round and two $100M raises by oncology-focused Flatiron Health. VCs invest in drug discovery: Startups are using machine learning algorithms to reduce drug discovery times, and VCs have backed 6 out of the 8 startups on the map. Andreessen Horowitz recently seed-funded twoXAR, developer of the DUMA drug discovery platform; Khosla Ventures and Data Collective backed Atomwise, which published its first findings of Ebola treatment drugs last year, and has also partnered with MERCK; Lightspeed Venture Partners invested in Numedii in 2013; Foundation Capital participated in 3 equity funding rounds to Numerate.