Goto

Collaborating Authors


A 20-Year Community Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence Research in the US

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) have produced formidable technologies that are providing immense benefit to industry, government, and society. AI systems can now translate across multiple languages, identify objects in images and video, streamline manufacturing processes, and control cars. The deployment of AI systems has not only created a trillion-dollar industry that is projected to quadruple in three years, but has also exposed the need to make AI systems fair, explainable, trustworthy, and secure. Future AI systems will rightfully be expected to reason effectively about the world in which they (and people) operate, handling complex tasks and responsibilities effectively and ethically, engaging in meaningful communication, and improving their awareness through experience. Achieving the full potential of AI technologies poses research challenges that require a radical transformation of the AI research enterprise, facilitated by significant and sustained investment. These are the major recommendations of a recent community effort coordinated by the Computing Community Consortium and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence to formulate a Roadmap for AI research and development over the next two decades.


TitAnt: Online Real-time Transaction Fraud Detection in Ant Financial

arXiv.org Machine Learning

With the explosive growth of e-commerce and the booming of e-payment, detecting online transaction fraud in real time has become increasingly important to Fintech business. To tackle this problem, we introduce the TitAnt, a transaction fraud detection system deployed in Ant Financial, one of the largest Fintech companies in the world. The system is able to predict online real-time transaction fraud in mere milliseconds. We present the problem definition, feature extraction, detection methods, implementation and deployment of the system, as well as empirical effectiveness. Extensive experiments have been conducted on large real-world transaction data to show the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed system.


Modeling Complementary Products and Customer Preferences with Context Knowledge for Online Recommendation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Modeling item complementariness and user preferences from purchase data is essential for learning good representations of products and customers, which empowers the modern personalized recommender system for Walmart's e-commerce platform. The intrinsic complementary relationship among products captures the buy-also-buy patterns and provides great sources for recommendations. Product complementary patterns, though often reflected by population purchase behaviors, are not separable from customer-specific bias in purchase data. We propose a unified model with Bayesian network structure that takes account of both factors. In the meantime, we merge the contextual knowledge of both products and customers into their representations. We also use the dual product embeddings to capture the intrinsic properties of complementariness, such as asymmetry. The separating hyperplane theory sheds light on the geometric interpretation of using the additional embedding. We conduct extensive evaluations on our model before final production, and propose a novel ranking criterion based on product and customer embeddings. Our method compares favorably to existing approaches in various offline and online testings, and case studies demonstrate the advantage and usefulness of the dual product embeddings as well as the user embeddings.


Thompson Sampling for Dynamic Pricing

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In this paper we apply active learning algorithms for dynamic pricing in a prominent e-commerce website. Dynamic pricing involves changing the price of items on a regular basis, and uses the feedback from the pricing decisions to update prices of the items. Most popular approaches to dynamic pricing use a passive learning approach, where the algorithm uses historical data to learn various parameters of the pricing problem, and uses the updated parameters to generate a new set of prices. We show that one can use active learning algorithms such as Thompson sampling to more efficiently learn the underlying parameters in a pricing problem. We apply our algorithms to a real e-commerce system and show that the algorithms indeed improve revenue compared to pricing algorithms that use passive learning.