Microsoft says its facial recognition technology is less biased

Mashable

Microsoft claims its facial recognition technology just got a little less awful. Earlier this year, a study by MIT researchers found that tools from IBM, Microsoft, and Chinese company Megvii could correctly identify light-skinned men with 99-percent accuracy. But it incorrectly identified darker-skinned women as often as one-third of the time. Now imagine a computer incorrectly flagging an image at an airport or in a police database, and you can see how dangerous those errors could be. Microsoft's software performed poorly in the study.


AI claims to be able to thwart facial recognition software, making you "invisible"

#artificialintelligence

A team of engineering researchers from the University of Toronto has created an algorithm to dynamically disrupt facial recognition systems. Led by professor Parham Aarabi and graduate student Avishek Bose, the team used a deep learning technique called "adversarial training", which pits two artificial intelligence algorithms against each other. Aarabi and Bose designed a set of two neural networks, the first one identifies faces and the other works on disrupting the facial recognition task of the first. The two constantly battle and learn from each other, setting up an ongoing AI arms race. "The disruptive AI can'attack' what the neural net for the face detection is looking for," Bose said in an interview.


These patterned glasses are all it takes to fool AI-powered facial recognition ZDNet

AITopics Original Links

The researchers have shown how it's possible to perturb facial recognition with patterned eyeglass frames. Researchers have developed patterned eyeglass frames that can trick facial-recognition algorithms into seeing someone else's face. The printed frames allowed three researchers from Carnegie Mellon to successfully dodge a facial-recognition system based on machine-learning 80 percent of the time. Using certain variants of the frames, a white male was also able to fool the algorithm into mistaking him for movie actress Milla Jovovich, while a South-Asian female tricked it into seeing a Middle Eastern male. A look at some of the best IoT and smart city projects which aim to make the lives of citizens better.


Homeland Security's controversial facial recognition system to be tested at Texas border this summer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is trialing a new facial recognition technology at US borders aimed at keeping track of people as the enter and exit the country. Called the Vehicle Face System, the project is being spearheaded by Customs and Border Protection at the Anzalduas Border Crossing, located at the southern tip of Texas, in August, according to the Verge. Sophisticated cameras will take photos of people arriving and departing the US and match them with government documents like visas and passports. The cameras are expected to remain in operation at the crossing for a full year. A customs spokesperson told the Verge that the purpose of the project will be to'evaluate capturing facial biometrics of travelers entering and departing the US and compare those images to photos on file in government holdings'.


Who Owns Your Face?

The Atlantic - Technology

Data brokers already buy and sell detailed profiles that describe who you are. They track your public records and your online behavior to figure out your age, your gender, your relationship status, your exact location, how much money you make, which supermarket you shop at, and on and on and on. It's entirely reasonable to wonder how companies are collecting and using images of you, too. Facebook already uses facial recognition software to tag individual people in photos. Apple's new app, Clips, recognizes individuals in the videos you take.