AI beats professional poker players in Pittsburgh

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) bot that beat professional players in a 20-day poker tournament. The bot, named Libratus, beat four of the World's best Heads-Up No-Limit Texas Hold'Em poker players at a casino in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Libratus won the tournament after 120,000 hands, winning with a lead of $1.7 million in virtual poker chips. Professor of computer science Tuomas Sandholm said: 'The best AI's ability to do strategic reasoning with imperfect information has now surpassed that of the best humans' The AI was developed at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) by Professor Tuomas Sandholm and his PhD student Noam Brown. They said that the AI's victory wasn't just a matter of luck - it was statistically significant.


In major AI win, Libratus beats four top poker pros

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Marking a major step forward for artificial intelligence (AI), Libratus, an AI developed by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), has resoundingly beaten four of the best heads-up no-limit Texas hold'em poker players in the world in a marathon, 20-day competition. After 20 days and a collective 120,000 hands played, Libratus closed out the competition Monday leading the pros by a collective $1,766,250 in chips. "I'm just impressed with the quality of poker Libratus plays," pro player Jason Les, a specialist in heads-up no-limit Texas hold'em like the other three players, said at a press conference yesterday morning. "They made algorithms that play this game better than us. We make a living trying to find vulnerabilities in strategies.


In major AI win, Libratus beats four top poker pros

#artificialintelligence

Marking a major step forward for artificial intelligence (AI), Libratus, an AI developed by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), has resoundingly beaten four of the best heads-up no-limit Texas hold'em poker players in the world in a marathon, 20-day competition. After 20 days and a collective 120,000 hands played, Libratus closed out the competition Monday leading the pros by a collective $1,766,250 in chips. "I'm just impressed with the quality of poker Libratus plays," pro player Jason Les, a specialist in heads-up no-limit Texas hold'em like the other three players, said at a press conference yesterday morning. "They made algorithms that play this game better than us. We make a living trying to find vulnerabilities in strategies.


AI just beat the world's 4 best poker players: What it means - TechRepublic

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The Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh may not seem a likely setting for a major scientific breakthrough. But on Tuesday, it was: Libratus, an AI system developed by Carnegie Mellon University, beat the world's top four human players in a 20-day tournament of Head's-Up No-Limit Texas Hold'em poker. Libratus, developed by Carnegie Mellon's Tuomas Sandholm, a professor of computer science, and Noam Brown, a Ph.D. student in computer science, competed against Dong Kim, Jimmy Chou, Daniel McAulay, and Jason Les in a competition called "Brains Vs. Artificial Intelligence: Upping the Ante"--during which 120,000 hands were played. "This is the last frontier," said Sandholm during a press conference on Tuesday.


AI has definitively bested humans at poker

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The 20-day poker tournament between four human pros and an artificial intelligence program concluded last night. The AI, named Libratus, was created by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and bested its opponents by $1.76 million in chips. "The best AI's ability to do strategic reasoning with imperfect information has now surpassed that of the best humans," said Libratus co-creator Tuomas Sandholm in a press release. While the AI has so far only been applied to poker, CMU is eager to experiment with its abilities in other fields. "The computer can't win at poker if it can't bluff," said Frank Pfenning, head of the Computer Science Department at CMU. "Developing an AI that can do that successfully is a tremendous step forward scientifically and has numerous applications.