Police trial of Amazon facial recognition tech doesn't seem to be going very well

Mashable

Amazon's facial recognition technology, Rekognition, continues to cause controversy. In documents recently obtained by BuzzFeed News, we now have a behind-the-scenes look at how Orlando police have been using the technology. After the city let the original pilot program expire after public outcry, Orlando started a second pilot program with an "increased" number of face-scanning cameras. Amazon's Rekognition is described broadly as a visual analysis tool. But, deployed by law enforcement, it can scan faces caught on camera and match them against faces in criminal databases.


Facial recognition tech used by UK police is making a ton of mistakes

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At the end of each summer for the last 14 years, the small Welsh town of Porthcawl has been invaded. Every year its 16,000 population is swamped by up to 35,000 Elvis fans. Many people attending the yearly festival look the same: they slick back their hair, throw on oversized sunglasses and don white flares. At 2017's Elvis festival, impersonators were faced with something different. Police were trialling automated facial recognition technology to track down criminals.


Honed over four decades, Osaka police use facial recognition skills to arrest dozens of wanted criminals every year

The Japan Times

OSAKA – Despite advances in facial recognition technology, the police in Osaka still rely on pure skill to find fugitives, with investigators using only their memory to arrest dozens of wanted criminals every year. While other police forces in the world have "super recognizer" units that hunt down fugitives, the so-called miatari (look and hit) technique used in Osaka has contributed to the arrests of over 4,000 criminals in Japan since the Osaka Prefectural Police introduced it as a formal investigative method in November 1978. There has not been a single wrongful arrest. "The best part of this method is being able to detect fugitives who are hard to find in normal investigations," said a senior investigator in Osaka. He says a forensic analysis is an imperative part of criminal investigations, but "we want to pass on the tradition because our job is to make sure no one gets away with a crime."


London police chief 'completely comfortable' using facial recognition

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The facial recognition software used by London's Metropolitan Police is producing a 98 per cent false positive rate. This means the system is regularly getting it wrong, with only two out of every 100 'matches' pinpointing the correct person. Despite this success rate, London's police commissioner Cressida Dick says she is'completely comfortable' to continue using the system in the capital. So far, the programme has resulted in only two accurate identifications – and neither pinpointed a wanted criminal. One was an individual from an out-of-date watch list, while the other was a person with a mental condition who regularly contacts public figures, but is not wanted for arrest.


Chinese Police Now Use Facial Recognition Glasses to Fight Crime

#artificialintelligence

Facial recognition technology will change the world. Still emerging into the mainstream, facial recognition technology has the potential to reshape that way you interact with the fringes of both the digital and real world. For the uninitiated, facial recognition is a biometric technology that scans people's face, photographs and recognizes them as an individual. Impressively, the technology can identify facial features like the space between the eyes, the depth of the eyes sockets, the width of the nose, cheekbones and the jawline.