DARPA introduces 'third wave' of artificial intelligence

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The Pentagon is launching a new artificial intelligence push it calls'AI Next' which aims to improve the relationship between machines and humans. As part of the multi-year initiative, the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is set to invest more than $2bn in the programme. In promo material for the programme, DARPA says AI Next will accelerate "the Third Wave" which enables machines to adapt to changing situations. For instance, adaptive reasoning will enable computer algorithms to discern the difference between the use of'principal' and'principle' based on the analysis of surrounding words to help determine context. "Today, machines lack contextual reasoning capabilities and their training must cover every eventuality – which is not only costly – but ultimately impossible.


DARPA launches massive new '3rd wave' next-gen artificial intelligence

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The Pentagon's science and technology research arm is launching a vigorous push into a new level of advanced artificial intelligence, intended to integrate advanced levels of "machine learning," introduce more "adaptive reasoning" and even help computers determine more subjective phenomena. It is called the 3rd Wave, a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency program to leverage rapid advances in AI to help train data to make computer analysis more reliable for human operators, agency Director Steven Walker recently told a small group of reporters. DARPA scientists explain the fast-evolving 3rd wave effort as improving the ability of AI-oriented technology to provide much more sophisticated "contextual explanatory models." While humans will still be needed in many instances, the 3rd Wave can be described as introducing a new ability to not only provide answers and interpretations - but also use "machine learning to reason in context and explain results," DARPA Deputy Director Peter Highnam said. In short, the 3rd Wave can explain the reason "why" it reached the conclusion it reached, something which offers a breakthrough level of computer-human interface, he added.


DARPA wants to build 'contextual' AI that understands the world

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We owe a lot to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a division of the U.S. Department of Defense responsible for the development of emerging technologies. The 60-year-old agency proposed and prototyped the precursor to the world wide web. It developed an interactive mapping solution akin to Google Maps. But it's also one of the birthplaces of machine learning, a kind of artificial intelligence (AI) that mimics the behavior of neurons in the brain. Dr. Brian Pierce, director of DARPA's Innovation Office, spoke about the agency's recent efforts at VB Summit 2018.


AI Next Campaign

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For more than five decades, DARPA has been a leader in generating groundbreaking research and development (R&D) that facilitated the advancement and application of rule-based and statistical-learning based AI technologies. Today, DARPA continues to lead innovation in AI research as it funds a broad portfolio of R&D programs, ranging from basic research to advanced technology development. DARPA believes this future, where systems are capable of acquiring new knowledge through generative contextual and explanatory models, will be realized upon the development and application of "Third Wave" AI technologies. DARPA announced in September 2018 a multi-year investment of more than $2 billion in new and existing programs called the "AI Next" campaign. Key areas of the campaign include automating critical DoD business processes, such as security clearance vetting or accrediting software systems for operational deployment; improving the robustness and reliability of AI systems; enhancing the security and resiliency of machine learning and AI technologies; reducing power, data, and performance inefficiencies; and pioneering the next generation of AI algorithms and applications, such as "explainability" and common sense reasoning.


DARPA wants to teach machines to handle new situations like 'biological systems' do - Fedscoop

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The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is in the process of spinning up a new research program to develop ways to teach machines to learn while they are operating -- and apply their knowledge to new situations "the way biological systems do." The agency is now accepting research proposals for the program's first funding opportunity via a Broad Agency Announcement, published last week. Dubbed the Lifelong Learning Machines program or L2M, DARPA plans through the four-year program to fund the development of "substantially more capable systems that are continually improving and updating from experience." Artificial intelligence systems today can't adapt to situations for which they were not already trained or programmed, as DARPA notes in its Broad Agency Announcement released last week. And so applying AI systems for military uses in areas like "supply chain, logistics and visual recognition" is difficult to do today, because many of those applications involve details that aren't defined in advance, according to DARPA.