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Homeland Security tightens screening for all flights from abroad -- but won't ban laptops

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security officials announced stricter passenger screening and other tougher security measures Wednesday for all commercial flights entering the United States, but said they would not bar laptop computers and e-readers in carry-on luggage as airlines had feared. The new rules will impact about 2,000 flights a day from 280 airports in 105 countries, a move that could make international flying more onerous just as the busy summer travel season starts. Secretary of Homeland Security John F. Kelly told a security conference in Washington that the enhanced measures would be "both seen and unseen." He did not say when they will begin but said they will be phased in to give airlines and airports time to adjust. Kelly said changes will include tougher screening of laptops and other personal electronic devices at airports, more thorough vetting of travelers, greater use of explosive-sniffing dogs, expanded exchanges of terrorist watch lists, and new systems to help prevent insider attacks by airline employees.


'I don't think it's a surprise to anybody that he fights fire with fire': White House spokeswoman defends Trump tweets

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. 'I don't think it's a surprise to anybody that he fights fire with fire': White House spokeswoman defends Trump tweets


Watch live: Press Briefing with Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Sanders

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S.


Gorsuch is pushing Supreme Court to the right on religion, guns and gays

Los Angeles Times

Homeland Security will tighten airport security - but won't ban laptops Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. Crunch time for McConnell after he is forced to delay Senate healthcare vote for at least 10 days Some in conservative media raise concerns about proposed GOP cuts in medicaid Trump succeeds where Obama failed - spawning a new wave of liberal activism Senate healthcare bill would add 22 million uninsured and raise costs for poor and sick, Congressional Budget Office says Tougher airport screening but no laptop ban for flights headed to U.S. When Judge Neil M. Gorsuch went before the Senate in March as President Trump's first nominee to the Supreme Court, he sought to assure senators he would be independent and above the political fray. "There is no such thing as a Republican judge or Democratic judge," he said more than once. But in just his first few weeks on the high court, Justice Gorsuch has shown himself to be a confident conservative activist, urging his colleagues to move the law to the right on religion, gun rights, gay rights and campaign funding. He dissented along with Justice Clarence Thomas when the court rejected a gun-rights challenge to California's law that strictly regulates who may carry a concealed weapon. "The 2nd Amendment's core purpose," they said, shows "the right to bear arms extends to public carry."


US demands more security on international flights to US

Associated Press

The Homeland Security Department is set to announce new security measures Wednesday for international flights bound to the United States, which could lead to a lifting of a ban on laptops and other electronics from passenger cabins from certain airports. The Homeland Security Department is set to announce new security measures Wednesday for international flights bound to the United States, which could lead to a lifting of a ban on laptops and other electronics from passenger cabins from certain airports. WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Homeland Security Department is demanding that airlines around the world step up security measures for international flights bound for the United States or face the possibility of a total electronics ban for planes. Compliance with the new rules could lead to the lifting of a ban on laptops and other large electronics already in place for airlines flying to the United States from 10 airports in the Middle East and Africa.