Pentagon Eyes Deep Machine Learning in Fight Against ISIS

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There is huge potential for deep machine learning to become a valuable asset in the intelligence gathering space, according to Pentagon Deputy Secretary Robert Work -- it could ultimately allow U.S. forces to get an edge in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS, ISIL, IS) by providing greater insights into their networks and practices. The evaluative capabilities and intelligence gathering promise of deep machine learning, Work said, has already shown great potential through the use of publicly available materials on social media, which paint a clearer picture of the events surrounding the downing of Malaysian passenger airliner MH17. Growing tensions between Russia and China were also discussed as a point of concern around the potential for machines to be given lethal authority and how the U.S. might respond in such a case. "There are two things that really keep me up at night about this competition; the first is adversaries who will give machines lethal authority and how will we respond to that," he said.


The killer robot threat: Pentagon examining how enemy nations could empower machines

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The Pentagon's No. 2 civilian official said Wednesday that the Defense Department is concerned that adversary nations could empower advanced weapons systems to act on their own, noting that while the United States will not give them the authority to kill autonomously, other countries might. Deputy Defense Secretary Robert O. Work said the Pentagon hasn't "fully figured out" the issue of autonomous machines, but continues to examine it. The U.S. military has built a force that relies heavily on the decision-making skills of its troops, but "authoritarian regimes" may find weapons that can act independently more attractive because doing so would consolidate the ability to take action among a handful of leaders, he said. "We will not delegate lethal authority to a machine to make a decision," Work said. "The only time we will… delegate a machine authority is in things that go faster than human reaction time, like cyber or electronic warfare."


Killer robot threat: Pentagon examining how enemies could empower machines

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The Pentagon's No. 2 civilian official said Wednesday that the Defense Department is concerned that adversary nations could empower advanced weapons systems to act on their own, noting that while the United States will not give them the authority to kill autonomously, other countries might. Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work said the Pentagon hasn't "fully figured out" the issue of autonomous machines, but continues to examine it. The U.S. military has built a force that relies heavily on the decision-making skills of its troops, but "authoritarian regimes" may find weapons that can act independently more attractive because it consolidates the ability to take action among a handful of leaders, he said. "We will not delegate lethal authority to a machine to make a decision," Work said. "The only time we will ... delegate a machine authority is in things that go faster than human reaction time, like cyber or electronic warfare."


Old aircraft re-purposed as AI drones for US fighter jets

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Armed drones could take to the air for testing alongside US fighter pilots as early as 2018. The Air Force's'Loyal Wingman' program aims to pair fifth generation fighter jets with unmanned older craft, using computer algorithms to give pilots control of the drones. The initiative would allow a drone to take the lead in navigating dangerous environments, pinpointing targets without putting a human pilot at risk. The Air Force's'Loyal Wingman' program aims to pair fifth generation fighter jets with unmanned older craft, using computer algorithms to give pilots remote control of the drones. The'Loyal Wingman' program would see the Air Force convert an older craft, like the F-16 warplane, into a semi-autonomous and unmanned fighter that flies alongside a fifth generation craft, like the F-35 jet.


The Pentagon is building a 'self-aware' killer robot army fueled by social media -- INSURGE intelligence

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An unclassified 2016 Department of Defense (DoD) document, the Human Systems Roadmap Review, reveals that the US military plans to create artificially intelligent (AI) autonomous weapon systems, which will use predictive social media analytics to make decisions on lethal force with minimal human involvement. Despite official insistence that humans will retain a "meaningful" degree of control over autonomous weapon systems, this and other Pentagon documents dated from 2015 to 2016 confirm that US military planners are already developing technologies designed to enable swarms of "self-aware" interconnected robots to design and execute kill operations against robot-selected targets. More alarmingly, the documents show that the DoD believes that within just fifteen years, it will be feasible for mission planning, target selection and the deployment of lethal force to be delegated entirely to autonomous weapon systems in air, land and sea. The Pentagon expects AI threat assessments for these autonomous operations to be derived from massive data sets including blogs, websites, and multimedia posts on social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. The raft of Pentagon documentation flatly contradicts Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work's denial that the DoD is planning to develop killer robots.