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Road to North Korea's denuclearization attempts littered with failure

The Japan Times

SEOUL – Bill Clinton offered oil and reactors. Barack Obama stopped trying after a rocket launch. While Seoul and Washington welcomed Pyongyang's declaration Saturday to suspend further intercontinental ballistic missile tests and shut down its nuclear test site, the past is littered with failure. A decades-long cycle of crises, stalemates and broken promises gave North Korea the room to build up a legitimate arsenal that now includes purported thermonuclear warheads and developmental ICBMs. The North's latest announcement stopped well short of suggesting it has any intention of giving that up.


How powerful is North Korea's military?

PBS NewsHour

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un observes a target-striking contest by the Korean People's Army (KPA) in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on April 13, 2017. North Korea has embarked on an accelerated buildup of weapons of mass destruction and modernization of its already large conventional force. The United States and its Asian allies regard North Korea as a grave security threat. It has one of the world's largest conventional military forces, which, combined with its escalating missile and nuclear tests and aggressive rhetoric, has aroused concern worldwide. But world powers have been ineffective in slowing its path to acquire nuclear weapons.


AP Explains: How to verify North Korea's nukes

FOX News

FILE - This undated file image distributed on Sept. 3, 2017, by the North Korean government, shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at an undisclosed location. The success of the second summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hinges largely on whether Kim proves he's truly committed to denuclearization. FILE- In this May 10, 2008, file photo, then U.S. State Department's top Korea specialist Sung Kim, center, and other officials cross the border as they carry box loads of documents detailing activity at North Korea's key nuclear reactor at the border village of Panmunjom in the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas, South Korea. The success of the second summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hinges largely on whether Kim proves he's truly committed to denuclearization. HANOI, Vietnam – The success of this week's second summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hinges largely on whether Kim proves he's truly committed to denuclearization.


Assassinations, nuclear tests, hugs: 70 years of the Korean War

Al Jazeera

Seventy years ago, on June 25, 1950, North Korean troops invaded South Korea in a bid to reunite the two countries. At the time, the Korean Peninsula was divided along the 38th parallel - a split unprecedented in Korean history - with the Soviet Union backing Kim Il-Sung's Workers Party in the North and the United States' supporting Syngman Rhee's government in the South. The three-year war - pitting Soviet and China-backed northern troops against US-led United Nations forces - killed an estimated two million people and laid to waste cities and villages on both sides of the border. It ended with an armistice between the US, China and North Korea, but South Korea did not agree, and no formal peace treaty was signed. And 70 years on, the two Koreas remain technically at war. Inter-Korean relations remain tense, with the North often pushing matters to the brink by a series of provocative actions, including assassination attempts on the South's leaders and the pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.


Key dates in North Korean history and weapons development

The Japan Times

SEOUL – North Korea carried out its fifth and most powerful nuclear test on Friday, sparking condemnation from regional leaders. Some 4 million are killed. War ends with an armistice, not a formal peace treaty. Late 1970s: North Korea starts working on a version of the Soviet Scud-B (range 300 kilometers, or 190 miles). He is succeeded by his son, Kim Jong Il.