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Japan calls for stronger Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty amid North Korea threat

The Japan Times

VIENNA – Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida called on the international community Tuesday to strengthen the nuclear nonproliferation regime, citing the growing threat posed by North Korea's nuclear and missile programs. Taking part in the preparatory committee for the 2020 review conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in Vienna, the first Japanese foreign minister to do so, Kishida also urged cooperation between nuclear states and non-nuclear states to prevent the spread of nuclear arms. "North Korea has conducted two nuclear tests and launched more than 30 ballistic missiles since last year. Its nuclear and missile development has reached a new level and is posing a real threat to the region and beyond in the international community," Kishida told the committee. Kishida, a veteran House of Representatives lawmaker from Hiroshima, which was devastated by a U.S. atomic bombing in 1945, condemned North Korea's aggressive pursuit of nuclear development as posing a "challenge" to the disarmament and non-proliferation regime under the treaty.


Japan calls on Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty members to push N. Korea further on nukes

The Japan Times

GENEVA – Foreign Minister Taro Kono on Tuesday called on parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty to urge North Korea to go beyond a freeze of nuclear testing and seek a "complete, verifiable and irreversible" end to its nuclear program. "North Korea's nuclear and missile programs pose a grave challenge to the international nuclear non-proliferation regime," Kono said in Geneva during the second preparatory committee meeting for the 2020 NPT review conference. Kono said Japan welcomes North Korea's promise last week to halt its testing of nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles, and to dismantle its main nuclear testing site. "We need to urge North Korea, however, to do more than what was announced," he said. He said the international community requires North Korea to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, or CTBT.


Supervising artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Fifty years ago this month, in the midst of the Cold War, nations began signing an international treaty to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. Today, as artificial intelligence and machine learning reshape every aspect of our lives, the world confronts a challenge of similar magnitude, and it needs a similar response. There is a danger in pushing the parallel between nuclear weapons and AI too far. But the greater risk lies in ignoring the consequences of unleashing technologies whose goals are neither predictable nor aligned with our values. The immediate prelude to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons was the Cuban missile crisis in 1962.


Nuclear non-proliferation group vows to work to achieve North Korea's denuclearization

The Japan Times

NAGOYA – Foreign ministers from a coalition of non-nuclear weapons states pledged Saturday to work in tandem to achieve North Korea's denuclearization, as the country's negotiations with the United States have been at a stalemate. "The current international security environment is fraught with uncertainty and tension," the ministers of the 12-member Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Initiative said in a joint statement released after their gathering in Nagoya. "We reaffirm our commitment to the international community's goal of complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of all North Korea's weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles of all ranges," the ministers added. North Korea has warned that it will resume nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missiles tests unless the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump makes concessions in talks over denuclearization by the end of this year. Since earlier this year, Pyongyang has continued to launch new weapons believed to be short-range missiles in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions that prohibit the nation from developing a nuclear arsenal and ballistic missiles.


Column: We Need a Treaty to Control Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Fifty years ago this month, in the midst of the Cold War, nations began signing an international treaty to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. Today, as artificial intelligence and machine learning reshape every aspect of our lives, the world confronts a challenge of similar magnitude and it needs a similar response. There is a danger in pushing the parallel between nuclear weapons and AI too far. But the greater risk lies in ignoring the consequences of unleashing technologies whose goals are neither predictable nor aligned with our values. The immediate prelude to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons was the Cuban missile crisis in 1962.