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From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


New Zealand Attack Underscores Social Media Sites' Tolerance of Anti-Muslim Content

Mother Jones

A police officer directs pedestrians near the site of one of the mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand on Saturday. Nearly a year ago, Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress that Facebook does not allow hate groups on its platform. "If there's a group that--their primary purpose or--or a large part of what they do is spreading hate, we will ban them from the platform," he told the House Energy and Commerce Committee on April 11, 2018. Across the country in San Francisco, Madihha Ahussain was watching from her office at Muslim Advocates, a civil rights group that seeks to protect Muslim Americans from discrimination, bigotry, and violence. She found the assertion shocking.


New Zealand shooting's a social media wake-up call -- YouTube, others, must stop amplifying violent crimes

FOX News

The heavily-armed shooter who mowed down 49 people and injured dozens of others in Christchurch, New Zealand, broadcast the attack from a helmet camera; Jonathan Hunt reports. The mass murder at two New Zealand mosques Friday, which claimed the lives of at least 49 people, was doubly shocking. First, it was an unspeakable desecration of houses of worship and tragic loss of life designed to horrify the faithful worldwide. And second, it was a livestreamed terrorist attack designed for and enabled by modern social media platforms including YouTube (owned by Google), Twitter and Facebook. What responsibility do these platforms and their users – all of us – have for such attacks?


After New Zealand mosque shootings and civil rights backlash, Facebook bans white nationalism, separatism

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Facebook's policy reversal marks a major step toward reckoning with the vast amount of white nationalist content that continues to fester on social media services. With a growing number of populist movements gaining hold around the globe, technology companies have been reluctant to ban white nationalist content, wary of charges of censorship. White nationalism hurtled back into the spotlight after a gunman opened fire at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, killing 50 people. In a 74-page manifesto, he described himself as an "ordinary white man" whose goal was to "crush immigration and deport those invaders already living on our soil" and "ensure the existence of our people, and a future for white children."