SAP Targets Terrorism With AI

#artificialintelligence

A specialized division of the business software powerhouse SAP (System Application Products) is building tools to harness machine learning and artificial intelligence for antiterrorist intelligence missions and cybersecurity--though details of how exactly the software has been used are shrouded in secrecy. SAP National Security Services, which describes itself as an independent subsidiary of the German-based software giant that's operated by U.S. citizens on American soil, works with homeland government agencies to find ways to track potential terrorists across social media. "One [use] is the identification of bad actors: People that may be threats to us--people and organizations," says Mark Testoni, president and CEO of SAP NS2, as the company is known. "Secondarily, once we've identified those kinds of players and actors, we can then track their behaviors and organizations." SAP NS2 is also working with cybersecurity firm ThreatConnect to use some of the same underlying technology to track intruders and menaces in computer networks in real time, the companies announced this week.


Detecting Fake News, Fake Reviews, Fake Accounts, Fake Pictures

@machinelearnbot

A while back, I was reading an article posted on Facebook, about Clovis people found alive and well living in Florida, with a picture featuring tribesmen (see below.) The quality of the picture was poor, and the URL was very suspicious: baynews9.com.ddwg.clonezone.link, as to make it appear that it was from Baynews9.com. It turned out that the picture (and thus the whole story) was fake: these people are real people living in Peru, see here for a Youtube video about them.


Woman accused of stealing from online dating matches has long history of fraud, officials say

Los Angeles Times

A woman accused of "capitalizing on her physical attraction" to steal the identities of people she met on dating and home rental websites will face a judge Wednesday after she was arrested at a luxury hotel in Santa Barbara, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Maria Christina Johnson, 43, is believed to have dated or rented from her victims to gain access to their homes, where she'd scavenged through their belongings to obtain enough personal information to open new lines of credit without their knowledge, authorities said. Johnson -- also known as Maria Hendricks, Gia Hendricks, Maria Christina Gia and Maria Hainka -- has been arrested and charged multiple times before for various forms of fraud, identity theft and burglary before, according to a statement from the sheriff's department. After she successfully assumed an identity, investigators say, she moved into high-end hotels and charged thousands of dollars of goods and services to her victims, even attempting to purchase a car at one point, authorities said. By the time she was arrested as a guest of a luxury, beachside coastal resort in Santa Barbara on Thursday, investigators estimated Johnson, who lists her occupation as a dog trainer, had spent more than 250,000 of her victims' funds.


Detecting Fake News, Fake Reviews, Fake Accounts, Fake Pictures

@machinelearnbot

A while back, I was reading an article posted on Facebook, about Clovis people found alive and well living in Florida, with a picture featuring tribesmen (see below.) The quality of the picture was poor, and the URL was very suspicious: baynews9.com.ddwg.clonezone.link, as to make it appear that it was from Baynews9.com. It turned out that the picture (and thus the whole story) was fake: these people are real people living in Peru, see here for a Youtube video about them. My question is how to detect that a story is fake? The picture might have metadata embedded in it, allowing the data scientist to find the real source, unless it is a screenshot.


Convicted identity thief stole from people she met through online dating sites, sheriff says

FOX News

A woman in California who previously served prison time for identity theft was busted at a high-end hotel after investigators said she used even more stolen cash to live a life of luxury, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Dept. Maria Christina Johnson was accused of stealing the identities of a slew of people she met through online dating and home rental websites. Investigators said she would "capitalize on her physical attraction" to get into victims' homes and obtain their personal information, ultimately using it to open new lines of credit. Courts in several states convicted Johnson on fraud and similar charges as early as 1997. She served at least 2 years in prison, the Los Angeles Times reported.