AlphaGo Wins Final Game In Match Against Champion Go Player

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

AlphaGo, a largely self-taught Go-playing AI, last night won the fifth and final game in a match held in Seoul, South Korea, against that country's Lee Sedol. Sedol is one of the greatest modern players of the ancient Chinese game. The final score was 4 games to 1. Thus falls the last and computationally hardest game that programmers have taken as a test of machine intelligence. Chess, AI's original touchstone, fell to the machines 19 years ago, but Go had been expected to last for many years to come. The sweeping victory means far more than the US 1 million prize, which Google's London-based acquisition, DeepMind, says it will give to charity.


Here's Everything New Coming to the Apple TV

TIME - Tech

Apple on Thursday announced a handful of updates coming to its Apple TV set-top box. The biggest change will be the introduction of a new TV app, which essentially functions as a TV guide for your numerous streaming apps. Here's a closer look at what Apple announced during a media event: Apple's new TV app is designed to surface content from various streaming apps, like HBO Go and Hulu, and house them in one easily browsable place. The "Up Next" section, for example, will act as a hub for content you've already started watching across all of these services. If you started a movie but didn't finish it, the "Up Next" tab will let you pick up where you left off.


Can Artificial Intelligence Predict Reality TV Winner? - Alizila

#artificialintelligence

Last month artificial intelligence technology reached a widely heralded milestone when a Google computer program called AlphaGo defeated the Go master Lee Se-dol at the ancient board game in a five-game series. Impressive, but can AliphaGo do this? On April 8, a computer program developed by Alibaba Group will attempt to predict the winner of a popular Chinese reality TV show by analyzing not potential moves on a glorified checkerboard but a range of complex and amorphous factors such as social media feedback, responses from a studio audience, and the "energy" of performers. The reality show in question is "I'm a Singer," an annual singing competition that pits well-known Asian pop stars--this week's season-ending finale features CoCo Lee, Hacken Lee, Jeff Chang and Joey Yung--against each other. Alibaba's cloud-computing arm, Alibaba Cloud, is using the competition to showcase a program it developed in-house called Apsara-I (Ai) that is able to gather insights from a multitude of inputs, can learn by analyzing data and even has the potential to understand human emotions, according to the company.


AlphaGo, Deep Learning, and the Future of the Human Microscopist

#artificialintelligence

In March of last year, Google's (Menlo Park, California) artificial intelligence (AI) computer program AlphaGo beat the best Go player in the world, 18-time champion Lee Se-dol, in a tournament, winning 4 of 5 games.1 At first glance this news would seem of little interest to a pathologist, or to anyone else for that matter. After all, many will remember that IBM's (Armonk, New York) computer program Deep Blue beat Garry Kasparov--at the time the greatest chess player in the world--and that was 19 years ago. The rules of the several-thousand-year-old game of Go are extremely simple. The board consists of 19 horizontal and 19 vertical black lines.


Google's Project Stream: Chrome becomes testbed for game streaming services

ZDNet

Google has revealed Project Stream, a test for cloud-based game streaming services in the Chrome browser. On Monday, the tech giant said that a new partnership with Ubisoft will bring Assassin's Creed Odyssey to the Chrome browser -- at least, to US residents -- from October 5. Google has been working on Project Stream for some time in an effort to resolve some of the technical challenges posed by game streaming, such as video quality degradation, frame skipping, and buffering. A delay of a few seconds when you are watching streamed content such as television shows or films is not generally a big deal, but when it comes to gaming -- especially if there are live participants and viewers -- a few seconds can cause graphics issues and lag. "The idea of streaming such graphically-rich content that requires near-instant interaction between the game controller and the graphics on the screen poses a number of challenges," Google says. "When streaming TV or movies, consumers are comfortable with a few seconds of buffering at the start, but streaming high-quality games requires latency measured in milliseconds, with no graphic degradation."