Coroner finds no evidence of trauma in Colton sixth-grader who died after school soccer game

Los Angeles Times

A Colton sixth-grader who collapsed during a school soccer game and died Tuesday suffered from an enlarged heart and early signs of congestive heart failure, according to a preliminary coroner's report. The death of 12-year-old Dominick Gallegos stunned classmates at Ulysses S. Grant Elementary School this week, while the boy's parents claimed that a bully had stomped on their son's chest. On Thursday, however, the San Bernardino County Coroner posted a preliminary autopsy that reported no evidence of trauma in the boy's death. "An autopsy was performed on Dominick today," the report stated. "No evidence of trauma was found.


Eric Garcetti wants college applications to stop asking about students' criminal records

Los Angeles Times

Eric Garcetti has recruited 32 other mayors across the country to join him in urging college admissions companies to stop asking applicants about their criminal histories. In a letter, the mayors petitioned the Common Application Association and Universal College Application -- two companies whose standard applications are used by many private universities -- "to remove any box that inquires into a person's past criminal history from your admissions applications." Garcetti joins other advocates and the federal government in making the case that the mere inquiry about criminal history can scare an applicant away. "Any box that inquires into criminal history has a strong chilling effect on applications in general," said Kimberley Guillemet, manager of The Los Angeles Mayor's Office of Reentry. "We know that when people see any box asking about their criminal background, a lot of them assume that they won't have a chance to be admitted on their merits and they won't pursue the process."


Dude, you ever wonder, like, why people celebrate pot on 4/20?

Los Angeles Times

Any self-respecting stoner knows what to do on 4/20. But few seem to know how the otherwise innocuous date became an international celebration of cannabis culture. The rumors about the origins of 4/20 tend to drift around like so much smoke from a tightly rolled joint: Is 420 the police radio code for smoking marijuana in public? Was it the day Adolf Hitler died? Did it mark the day of death of someone else famous or infamous?


'Game of Thrones'? More like waste of time

Los Angeles Times

For those who must live and work among them, the next couple of months will be a challenge. Beginning this Sunday, these loyal subjects will return to Muggleshire, or Rivenmoore or wherever it is that HBO's "Game of Thrones" is supposed to take place. Prepare yourself for loved ones and co-workers shocked, outraged and generally agitated by the imaginary things that happen in this magical land that never existed. Of all the successes HBO has enjoyed with its hour-long dramas, "Game of Thrones" is perhaps the most surprising. Who could have foreseen that fantasy, a genre that suppresses the horrors of middle school by escaping into the womb of Middle Earth, would emerge as the ratings champion of premium cable?


Cornell University welcomes 12-year-old college freshman

#artificialintelligence

A 12-year-old who read The Lord Of The Rings aged five has become the youngest Cornell University freshman in the Ivy School's history. Jeremy Shuler was home-schooled by his parents - both aerospace engineers from Grand Prairie, Texas - and started reading books in English and Korean aged two. To help get him into Cornell, Jeremy's parents moved to Ithaca, where his father, Andy Shuler, took up a post at Lockheed Martin Upstate New York. A 12-year-old who started studying calculus aged 6 has become the youngest Cornell University freshman in the Ivy School's history With his bowl-cut hair, cherubic face and frequent happy laughter, Jeremy is clearly still a child despite his advanced intelligence. He swung in his chair while his parents, who he calls Mommy and Daddy, recounted his early years during an interview at the engineering school where his grandfather is a professor, his father got his doctorate and Jeremy is now an undergrad.