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Artificial Intelligence Helps Improve NASA's Eyes on the Sun

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A group of researchers is using artificial intelligence techniques to calibrate some of NASA's images of the Sun, helping improve the data that scientists use for solar research. A solar telescope has a tough job. Staring at the Sun takes a harsh toll, with a constant bombardment by a never-ending stream of solar particles and intense sunlight. Over time, the sensitive lenses and sensors of solar telescopes begin to degrade. To ensure the data such instruments send back is still accurate, scientists recalibrate periodically to make sure they understand just how the instrument is changing.


Scientists Look Up To Artificial Intelligence Techniques to Improve Solar Data from the Sun

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Researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to calibrate some of NASA's images of the Sun. Launched in 2010, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has provided high-definition images of the Sun for over a decade. The Atmospheric Imagery Assembly, or AIA, is one of two imaging instruments on SDO and looks constantly at the Sun, taking images across 10 wavelengths of ultraviolet light every 12 seconds. This creates a wealth of information of the Sun like no other, but like all Sun-staring instruments--AIA degrades over time, and the data needs to be frequently calibrated, NASA said in a statement. To overcome this challenge, scientists decided to look at other options to calibrate the instrument, with an eye towards constant calibration.


NASA is using AI to take better pictures of the sun as

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The sun may be the most powerful source of energy in the Milky Way, but NASA researchers are using artificial intelligence to get a better view of the giant ball of gas. The US space agency is using machine learning on solar telescopes, including its Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), launched in 2010, and its Atmospheric Imagery Assembly (AIA), imaging instrument that looks constantly at the sun. This allows the agency to snap incredible pictures of the celestial giant, while limiting the effects of solar particles and'intense sunlight,' which begins to degrade lenses and sensors over time. The sun goes through an 11-year cycle where it goes from very active to less active. It is tracked by sunspots and it is currently going through a quiet phase.


NASA's new AI can stare at the sun without shades - and without damaging its vision

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When you were a kid, were you ever told not to look directly into the flaming eye of the Sun? It can be almost as dangerous for solar telescopes. The Atmospheric Imagery Assembly or AIA has been staring right into those flames for over a decade aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). AIA can see in 3 UV wavelengths and 7 extreme UV (EUV) wavelengths, and anything in the UV range is too short for the human eye. AIA has to suffer for science.


Calibrating NASA's images of the Sun using AI

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Since it launched on February 11, 2010, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, has provided high-definition images of the Sun for over a decade. The images have provided a detailed look at various solar phenomena. SDO uses Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) to continuously look at the sun, taking images in 10 wavelengths every 10 seconds. It creates a wealth of information about our Sun never previously possible. Due to constant staring, AIA degrades over time, and the data needs to be frequently calibrated.