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New Genome Scores Predict Breast Cancer Odds for Any Woman

MIT Technology Review

The actress Angelina Jolie prompted droves of women to seek genetic testing after she revealed, in 2013, that a "faulty gene" called BRCA1 had given her an 87 percent chance of developing breast cancer.


Immunotherapy Scores a First Win Against Some Breast Cancers

U.S. News

Tecentriq is $12,500 a month. The chemo in this study was Celgene's Abraxane, which costs about $3,000 per dose plus doctor fees for the IV treatments. Older chemo drugs cost less but require patients to use a steroid to prevent allergic reactions that might interfere with the immunotherapy. Abraxane was chosen because it avoids the need for a steroid, said one study leader, Dr. Sylvia Adams of NYU Langone Health.


Immunotherapy scores a first win against some breast cancers

Los Angeles Times

Tecentriq is $12,500 a month. The chemo in this study was Celgene's Abraxane, which costs about $3,000 a dose plus doctor fees for the IV treatments. Older chemo drugs cost less but require patients to use a steroid to prevent allergic reactions that might interfere with the immunotherapy. Abraxane was chosen because it avoids the need for a steroid, said one study leader, Dr. Sylvia Adams of NYU Langone Health.


The 5 Most Common Cancers In Men

International Business Times

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S., and is expected to be the number one killer in 16 years. Men are more likely to die of cancer than women, but scientific advancements like antibiotics, vaccines, and chemotherapy have decreased how often people die of cancer. Prostate cancer is the leading cancer for males, but there are other cancers men should protect themselves against as well. Prostate cancer is the number one cancer risk for men, and the number two cancer killer (after lung cancer). About one man in seven will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society.


Head and neck cancer drug 'game changer'

BBC News

A new type of cancer drug that wakes up the patient's own immune system to fight tumours could be a game changer for tackling aggressive head and neck cancers, say experts. Trial results coming out of a US cancer conference suggest the treatment works better than standard chemotherapy. Nivolumab significantly improved the survival odds of patients with these hard-to-treat tumours. It is already available on the NHS for people with advanced skin cancer. But experts say more research is needed before offering it routinely to patients with other cancers.