Government Health Insurance Markets Holding Up--Barely

U.S. News

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013, file photo, Alan Leafman, center, president of Health Insurance Express, Inc., helps Raquel Bernal, right, and her husband John Bernal, both of Apache Junction, Ariz., navigate the nation's health care insurance system online at the Health Insurance Express store in Mesa, Ariz. Enough insurers are planning to sell coverage through the Affordable Care Act in 2018 to keep the market place working, if only barely, in most parts of the country. However competition in many markets has dwindled to one insurer, or none in some cases, and another round of steep price hikes is expected to squeeze consumers who don't receive big income-based tax credits to help pay their bill.


The Insurance Industry Is Dead... Long Live the Insurance Industry

Forbes Technology

The health insurance industry as we know it is dead. No matter how much the behemoths of the sector defend their current positions and attempt to catch up with the disruptors, their hegemony is over. Whether it's updating ancient or legacy systems, inherited technology from acquisitions or bolting IoT products on to insurance policies such as Fitbit or black boxes monitoring data in vehicles, the end is nigh for these companies. Crowdfunding, going'mutual', easy-profit philanthropy, PR budgets that make the mind boggle, none of it is working. The so-called InsurTech industry in many ways resembles the FinTech revolution.


The Insurance Industry Is Dead... Long Live the Insurance Industry

Forbes Technology

The health insurance industry as we know it is dead. No matter how much the behemoths of the sector defend their current positions and attempt to catch up with the disruptors, their hegemony is over. Whether it's updating ancient or legacy systems, inherited technology from acquisitions or bolting IoT products on to insurance policies such as Fitbit or black boxes monitoring data in vehicles, the end is nigh for these companies. Crowdfunding, going'mutual', easy-profit philanthropy, PR budgets that make the mind boggle, none of it is working. The so-called InsurTech industry in many ways resembles the FinTech revolution.


From Anthem to Aetna, major health insurers are leaving ObamaCare marketplace

FOX News

Anthem, one of the largest health insurers in the U.S., announced Monday that it will not offer plans through the Affordable Care Act's insurance marketplace in Nevada next year. The insurer also is expected to drastically scale back the plans it offers in Georgia, leaving only some insured in rural counties that otherwise would be left without coverage. With the removal of Anthem, there are 14 counties in Nevada that will not have health insurance for individuals, according to Fox Business. "Planning and pricing for ACA-compliant health plans has become increasingly difficult due to a shrinking and deteriorating individual market, as well as continual changes and uncertainty in federal operations, rules and guidance, including cost sharing reduction subsidies and the restoration of taxes on fully insured coverage," Anthem said in a statement Monday. Analysts said four months ago that the insurance company was expected to exit a "high percentage" of its plans in the 144 regions where it participated.


ObamaCare premiums would rise if Trump ends insurer subsidies, CBO says

FOX News

ObamaCare premiums would rise 20 percent and the federal deficit would increase by $6 billion next year if President Trump follows through on threats to end subsidies for insurers, the Congressional Budget Office said in a report released Tuesday. A White House spokesman dismissed the projections as "flawed" and said "no final decisions have been made" on ending what are known as cost-sharing subsidies. The president has threatened to end the "bailouts" for insurance companies if Congress doesn't pass health care legislation repealing former President Barack Obama's 2010 law. Insurers receive federal payments under ObamaCare to cover costs related to the law's requirement to offer plans with reduced deductibles and copayments to some people who purchase health insurance. The CBO said premiums for plans offered through the ObamaCare market places would be 20 percent higher in 2018 and 25 percent higher in 2020 if the payments are scrapped.