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White House Chief of Staff's Personal Cellphone Compromised: Politico

U.S. News

FILE PHOTO - White House Chief of Staff John Kelly speaks on his phone in a hallway outside the room where U.S. President Donald Trump was meeting with Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko during the U.N. General Assembly in New York, U.S., September 21, 2017.


Trump's cellphone use worries security experts

Associated Press

Trump has been handing out his cellphone number to counterparts around the world, urging them to call him directly to avoid the red tape of diplomatic communications. Trump has been handing out his cellphone number to counterparts around the world, urging them to call him directly to avoid the red tape of diplomatic communications. WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump, who blasted Hillary Clinton for using a personal email server, might be a walking magnet for eavesdropping and malware if he is using an unsecured cellphone to chat with foreign leaders. Trump has been handing out his cellphone number to counterparts around the world, urging them to call him directly to avoid the red tape of diplomatic communications.


Russia is hacking the phones of NATO soldiers

Engadget

Russia's digital warfare campaign isn't limited to targeting distant servers. The Wall Street Journal has learned that Russian hackers are targeting individual NATO soldiers near, such as those deployed to Poland and the Baltic states. And while the Russian government has historically denied involvement in any hacking campaign, officials have little doubt that it's behind the attacks. Western forces note that the efforts are not only very well-coordinated, but that the equipment involved is likely too sophisticated for criminals. A probe spotted a portable antenna used to compromise phones, for example, while drones are also part of the campaign.


Rohingya refugees have only memories, saved on cellphones

FOX News

KUTUPALONG, Bangladesh – Abdul Hasan can spend hours watching old videos he shot on his cellphone.


It's Not a Bird or a Plane. It's a 17-Foot Drone, and It's Here to Save Your Cellphone Service.

#artificialintelligence

Verizon is trying to determine how a portable 4G LTE hot spot could work in an area "where a disaster had impacted Verizon service and there is no other way to get cellular coverage to that location," said Christopher Desmond, a principal engineer for the company. The trial in Cape May was the company's second in New Jersey and it reaffirmed the viability of the concept, Mr. Desmond said. Verizon is not alone in exploring the use of drones to help when disasters strike. In 2017, AT&T won a $7 billion federal government contract to construct a nationwide disaster readiness network called FirstNet. Parts of the program will include technology to provide cell service from the sky.