Google just proved how unpredictable artificial intelligence can be

#artificialintelligence

Associated Press/Ahn Young-joonTV screens show the live broadcast of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match between Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, and South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol, at the Yongsan Electronic store in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Humans have been taking a beating from computers lately. The 4-1 defeat of Go grandmaster Lee Se-Dol by Google's AlphaGo artificial intelligence (AI) is only the latest in a string of pursuits in which technology has triumphed over humanity. Self-driving cars are already less accident-prone than human drivers, the TV quiz show Jeopardy! is a lost cause, and in chess humans have fallen so woefully behind computers that a recent international tournament was won by a mobile phone. There is a real sense that this month's human vs AI Go match marks a turning point.


Google just proved how unpredictable artificial intelligence can be

#artificialintelligence

Humans have been taking a beating from computers lately. The 4-1 defeat of Go grandmaster Lee Se-Dol by Google's AlphaGo artificial intelligence (AI) is only the latest in a string of pursuits in which technology has triumphed over humanity. Self-driving cars are already less accident-prone than human drivers, the TV quiz show Jeopardy! is a lost cause, and in chess humans have fallen so woefully behind computers that a recent international tournament was won by a mobile phone. There is a real sense that this month's human vs AI Go match marks a turning point. Go has long been held up as requiring levels of human intuition and pattern recognition that should be beyond the powers of number-crunching computers.


Google's Go victory shows AI thinking can be unpredictable, and that's a concern

#artificialintelligence

Humans have been taking a beating from computers lately. The 4-1 defeat of Go grandmaster Lee Se-Dol by Google's AlphaGo artificial intelligence (AI) is only the latest in a string of pursuits in which technology has triumphed over humanity. Self-driving cars are already less accident-prone than human drivers, the TV quiz show Jeopardy! is a lost cause, and in chess humans have fallen so woefully behind computers that a recent international tournament was won by a mobile phone. There is a real sense that this month's human vs AI Go match marks a turning point. Go has long been held up as requiring levels of human intuition and pattern recognition that should be beyond the powers of number-crunching computers.


At CES 2017, Alexa, paper-thin TVs were early stars

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Columnist Jennifer Jolly tries out Alexa on the Ford, peers at TVs held to walls by magnets, and tests a'smart bike'. There's the equivalent of some 43-football fields worth of space filled with gadgets at CES 2017. With that many tech toys to explore, they all start to blur together pretty quickly. Here's what I've seen so far that's made an impression. Ford is making it all possible with its SYNC 3 AppLink software, so you can use Alexa's voice commands to ask for directions, get a rundown of the top headlines, add milk to your shopping list, or catch the latest New York Times bestseller via audiobook.


Artificial Intelligence has been used to create DOOM maps

#artificialintelligence

While Artificial Intelligence (AI) is being created for self-driving cars, medical advancements and generally for the betterment of humanity, or to beat a top Chess player, we don't see it used too often in the gaming industry. I'm not talking about AI in the sense of NPCs running away from danger or throwing a grenade back at you in a Call of Duty title, but instead, about powerful AI that could one day change the way games are developed. Well, some researchers have managed to get AI to build levels for the original DOOM without the help of humans. Let me be the first to say that I, for one, welcome our new AI overlords. This comes from a research paper, published by the Cornel University Library, entitled "DOOM Level Generation using Generative Adversarial Networks" authored by Edoardo Giacomello, Pier Luca Lanzi, and Daniele Loiacono.