Hackers steal dead people's medical records and sell them on the dark web

The Independent - Tech

Medical records of deceased patients are appearing on illicit market places on the dark web, cyber security researchers have discovered. Cyber criminals are advertising huge caches of personal data of up to 140 million patients, with their value exceeding that of stolen credit card details. The morbid trend follows an increasing amount of incidents of medical data breaches, as reported by Oren Koriat, an analyst at the security firm Cynerio. "Cynerio is still seeing continued growth in the number of incidents of patient medical record breaches from hacking and unauthorised access to healthcare systems," Mr Koriat wrote. "Recently, Cynerio has detected an interesting new wrinkle in the sale of stolen medical data on the dark web.


Facebook gives special protections to racist pages and allows extreme content to be shared, investigation shows

The Independent - Tech

Facebook gives special protections to Tommy Robinson and allows people to racially abuse immigrants, according to a new report. Graphic images and videos of children, violent hate speech and racist content are not immediately or automatically removed from the site, according to footage taken by Channel 4's Dispatches. An undercover reporter filmed the people who review content to decide whether it should stay up to be viewed by the public, gaining an unprecedented insight into what is allowed to be posted on the platform. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Paul Allen death: The Microsoft founder who was a space pioneer, football lover and guitar player 'as good as Hendrix'

The Independent - Tech

Paul Allen found fame and immense fortune through his work building Microsoft. But his passions were as broad as they were spectacular: he had an enthusiasm for everything from rocket ships to rock'n'roll. The Microsoft co-founder died in Seattle this week from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, according to his company Vulcan Inc. Allen came to fame and fortune as a consequence of his work with Microsoft. He gave the company its name and its start, and spawned an entire industry that changed the world: "Personal computing would not have existed without him," Bill Gates said in a statement. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


Hackers will soon be able to manipulate people's memory through brain implants, researchers warn

The Independent - Tech

The development of so-called neurostimulators may lead to dystopian scenarios whereby hackers create false memories and implant them in people's brains, researchers have warned. The human brain is vulnerable to manipulation through implantable medical devices used to treat things like Parkinson's, according to a practical and theoretical review of this and other scenarios undertaken by the University of Oxford Functional Neurosurgery Group and Russian cyber security firm Kaspersky. Within a decade, technology will also have progressed to the point that commercial memory boosting implants will be available to buy, according to the researchers, while 20 years from now could see a time when it will the technology will be advanced enough to allow for "extensive control over memories." The development of these technologies will have a number of healthcare benefits and will open up the possibility of new bio-connected technologies like increased brain capacity, however it also holds the potential for exploitation and abuse. "New threats resulting from this could include the mass manipulation of groups through implanted or erased memories of political events or conflicts; while'repurposed' cyberthreats could target new opportunities for cyber-espionage or the theft, deletion of, or'locking' of memories (for example, in return for a ransom)," the researchers wrote in their report'The Memory Market: Preparing for a future where cyberthreats target your past'.


European Parliament rejects controversial copyright rules in major victory for campaigners

The Independent - Tech

The European Parliament has voted against an incredibly controversial new set of copyright rules that campaigners claim could "ban memes". The law will now be sent for a full reconsideration and debate inside the parliament, during which activists will try and remove the controversial Article 11 and 13. Article 11 has been referred to by campaigners as instituting a "link tax", by forcing tech companies like Google and Facebook to pay to use snippets of content on their own sites. Article 13 adds rules that make tech companies responsible for ensuring any copyrighted material is not spread over their platforms. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.