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Collaborating Authors

Mathematical Foundations for Social Computing

Communications of the ACM

Yiling Chen (yiling@seas.harvard.edu) is Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Arpita Ghosh (arpitaghosh@cornell.edu) is an associate professor of information science at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Michael Kearns (mkearns@cis.upenn.edu) is a professor and National Center Chair of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Tim Roughgarden (tim@cs.stanford.edu) is an associate professor of CS at Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Jennifer Wortman Vaughan (jenn@microsoft.com) is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research, New York, NY.


Mathematical Foundations for Social Computing

#artificialintelligence

Yiling Chen (yiling@seas.harvard.edu) is Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Arpita Ghosh (arpitaghosh@cornell.edu) is an associate professor of information science at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Michael Kearns (mkearns@cis.upenn.edu) is a professor and National Center Chair of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Tim Roughgarden (tim@cs.stanford.edu) is an associate professor of CS at Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Jennifer Wortman Vaughan (jenn@microsoft.com) is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research, New York, NY.


Facebook data could predict spread of disease outbreaks says new research on 'social-connectedness'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Researchers say evaluating the'social-connectedness' of regions using Facebook data could give epidemiologists another tool in judging the spread of infectious disease outside of geographic proximity and population density. The study, which appears in the preprint journal ArXiv and is authored by researchers from New York University, found links between two hotspots of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic - Westchester County, New York and Lodi province in Italy - to areas with correlating connections on the social media platform, Facebook. Using an equation developed by the same researchers in 2017 called the'Social Connectedness Index' the study was able to make correlations between the spread of COVID-19 from Westchester County and Lodi to geographically disparate locations like ski resorts on Florida and vacation spots in Rimini, Italy near the Adriatic sea. Those correlations remained even after controlling for wealth, population density, and geographic proximity according to researchers. Levels of social connectedness didn't always correlate to the disproportionate spread of the virus, however.


Apple to pay $24.9 million to settle Siri patent lawsuit

AITopics Original Links

Apple has agreed to pay $24.9 million to a patent holding company to resolve a 5-year-old lawsuit accusing Siri of infringing one of its patents. Apple will pay the money to Marathon Patent Group, the parent company of Texas firm Dynamic Advances, which held an exclusive license to a 2007 patent covering natural language user interfaces for enterprise databases. Marathon reported the settlement in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Tuesday. On Wednesday, in response to the settlement, Magistrate Judge David Peebles of U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York dismissed a lawsuit against Apple filed by Dynamic Advances and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, where the natural language technology was created. A trial had been scheduled to begin early next month in Syracuse, New York.


Why the internet of things could destroy the welfare state

AITopics Original Links

On 24 August 1965 Gloria Placente, a 34-year-old resident of Queens, New York, was driving to Orchard Beach in the Bronx. Clad in shorts and sunglasses, the housewife was looking forward to quiet time at the beach. But the moment she crossed the Willis Avenue bridge in her Chevrolet Corvair, Placente was surrounded by a dozen patrolmen. There were also 125 reporters, eager to witness the launch of New York police department's Operation Corral – an acronym for Computer Oriented Retrieval of Auto Larcenists. Fifteen months earlier, Placente had driven through a red light and neglected to answer the summons, an offence that Corral was going to punish with a heavy dose of techno-Kafkaesque. It worked as follows: a police car stationed at one end of the bridge radioed the licence plates of oncoming cars to a teletypist miles away, who fed them to a Univac 490 computer, an expensive $500,000 toy ($3.5m in today's dollars) on loan from the Sperry Rand Corporation. The computer checked the numbers against a database of 110,000 cars that were either stolen or belonged to known offenders. In case of a match the teletypist would alert a second patrol car at the bridge's other exit. It took, on average, just seven seconds. Compared with the impressive police gear of today – automatic number plate recognition, CCTV cameras, GPS trackers – Operation Corral looks quaint.