The Latest: FBI: Pittsburgh suspect not known to authorities

FOX News

First responders surround the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pa., where a shooter opened fire Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. An FBI official says the man suspected of killing 11 people at a Pennsylvania synagogue was not known to law enforcement. Bob Jones, the special agent in charge of the FBI's office in Pittsburgh, says investigators believe Robert Bowers was acting alone. He says Bowers' full motive still isn't known. Jones said the scene of Saturday's shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation was "the most horrific crime scene I have seen" in 22 years with the FBI.


The Latest: Hospital chaplain among synagogue victims

FOX News

People light candles as they gather for a vigil in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation, in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. A nurse and chaplain at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center is among the survivors of a gunman's deadly rampage through a synagogue on Saturday. His brother tells the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that Daniel Leger was in critical condition Saturday after undergoing surgery at UPMC Presbyterian in Oakland, Pennsylvania. Paul Leger says his brother may need a second surgery. Daniel Leger, who is married and has two sons, was scheduled to lead a service Saturday morning at the Tree of Life synagogue where 11 people died. He was among six injured, including four police officers. Thousands of people jammed an intersection amid a light rain for a vigil Saturday evening for the victims of a shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue earlier in the day.


The Latest: Thousands filled with grief at shooting vigil

FOX News

People light candles as they gather for a vigil in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation, in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. Thousands of people jammed an intersection amid a light rain for a vigil Saturday evening for the victims of a shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue earlier in the day. The gathering included prayers and singing in memory of those killed and wounded. A "vote, vote, vote" chant broke out during the emotional gathering where some derided the nation's political climate. Several attendees blamed the shooting on the nation's political climate and said they took little solace in a planned visit by President Donald Trump. Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf attended the vigil, suspending a campaign bus trip after learning of the attack. State Rep. Dan Frankel, who represents the district that includes the synagogue, was speaking at a house party about a block away when the shooting occurred.


Religious leaders, others express horror at synagogue attack

FOX News

People hold candles as they gather for a vigil in the aftermath of a deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Congregation, in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018. PITTSBURGH – Reaction to the Saturday morning shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, where a man killed 11 people and wounded six in one of the deadliest attacks on Jews in U.S. history: "This evil Anti-Semitic attack is an assault on humanity. It will take all of us working together to extract the poison of Anti-Semitism from our world. We must unite to conquer hate." "We grieve for the Americans murdered in Pittsburgh. All of us have to fight the rise of anti-Semitism and hateful rhetoric against those who look, love, or pray differently. And we have to stop making it so easy for those who want to harm the innocent to get their hands on a gun." -- former President Barack Obama.


Gunman attacks Pittsburgh synagogue, killing 11 people

FOX News

PITTSBURGH – A gunman who's believed to have spewed anti-Semitic slurs and rhetoric on social media barged into a baby-naming ceremony at a Pittsburgh synagogue on Saturday and opened fire, killing 11 people in one of the deadliest attacks on Jews in U.S. history. The 20-minute attack at Tree of Life Congregation in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood left at least six others wounded, including four police officers who dashed to the scene, authorities said. The suspect, Robert Bowers, traded gunfire with police and was shot several times. Bowers, who was in fair condition at a hospital, was expected to face federal hate-crime charges. "Please know that justice in this case will be swift and it will be severe," Scott Brady, the chief federal prosecutor in western Pennsylvania, said at a late-afternoon news conference, characterizing the slaughter as a "terrible and unspeakable act of hate."