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Tesla self-driving demo shows you what the car sees

Engadget

Sure, Tesla's first demo of full self-driving features was intriguing. But did you wonder what it was like from the car's point of view? You're about to find out. Tesla has posted another demo video that shows what an autonomous EV sees as it navigates local roads. As the clip illustrates, the cameras and sensors have to detect many, many different objects at any given moment: road lines, signs, lights, pedestrians and cars are among the many examples.


Elon Musk shows how Tesla self-driving cars will be fun and easy

Mashable

Tesla founder Elon Musk made waves last month when he announced that the company would begin equipping all new vehicles with self-driving hardware. Although we're still at least a few years away from any city being dominated by self-driving cars, on Saturday Musk decided to give us a preview of what the future will be like with self-driving Tesla cars. The first video, set to the theme song of The Benny Hill Show takes us on a ride with a self-driving Tesla as the passenger sits in the driver's seat, hands on his lap and feet away from the gas and brake pedals. The high-speed video shows the vehicle easily handling real world road situations including stop signs, pedestrians and unexpected moves from other vehicles. At one point, the car even stops for a pair of joggers on the side of the road, just to be safe.


Apple Self-Driving Technology: 5 Facts You Need To Know

International Business Times

Apple has been interested in automotive technology for a long time -- the company already has the CarPlay infotainment system. But now it is moving further into the automotive industry and is working on its own self-driving technology. Apple was granted a permit to test its self-driving technology in California earlier this month. The state released 41 pages of application documents to Business Insider because of a request to access public records. While the company has not made a formal acknowledgement of the information mentioned in the documents, a lot of light has been shed on what the company plans to do in terms of its self-driving program.


Tesla's promise of 'full-self-driving' angers autonomous vehicle experts

#artificialintelligence

Washington, DC (CNN Business)Tesla is selling its cars with the option of "full self-driving capability," a feature that's drawing criticism from experts on self-driving technology. They say CEO Elon Musk is playing fast and loose with definitions, overselling the technology and potentially creating safety issues. When Tesla announced the $35,000 Model 3 Thursday, it said it would come with an optional $5,000 feature: full self-driving capability. The system will offer "automatic driving on city streets" as an update later this year, according to Tesla's website. A Tesla spokeswoman declined to comment on details around the automatic driving option, and pointed CNN Business to fine print on Tesla's order page that tells buyers the currently enabled features require "active" driver supervision and do not make the vehicle autonomous.


Tesla Won't Let You Use Its Self-Driving Cars For Uber

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

Owners of self-driving Teslas have to agree ahead of time not to use the vehicle to generate revenue via a ride-hailing service like Lyft or Uber; instead, they'll operate exclusively for a forthcoming service named (for now, at least) the "Tesla Network." Tesla didn't immediately respond to a request for comment from The Huffington Post, but Musk laid out the likely explanation for how a network of self-driving Teslas might function in a blog post earlier this summer. Under a subhead titled "Sharing" on a post intended to detail his long-term plan for the company, Musk explained: "You will also be able to add your car to the Tesla shared fleet just by tapping a button on the Tesla phone app and have it generate income for you while you're at work or on vacation, significantly offsetting and at times potentially exceeding the monthly loan or lease cost."