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AI, automation, and the future of work: Ten things to solve for

#artificialintelligence

Beyond traditional industrial automation and advanced robots, new generations of more capable autonomous systems are appearing in environments ranging from autonomous vehicles on roads to automated check-outs in grocery stores. Much of this progress has been driven by improvements in systems and components, including mechanics, sensors and software. AI has made especially large strides in recent years, as machine-learning algorithms have become more sophisticated and made use of huge increases in computing power and of the exponential growth in data available to train them. Spectacular breakthroughs are making headlines, many involving beyond-human capabilities in computer vision, natural language processing, and complex games such as Go. These technologies are already generating value in various products and services, and companies across sectors use them in an array of processes to personalize product recommendations, find anomalies in production, identify fraudulent transactions, and more.


What the future of work will mean for jobs, skills, and wages

@machinelearnbot

In an era marked by rapid advances in automation and artificial intelligence, new research assesses the jobs lost and jobs gained under different scenarios through 2030.


The promise and challenge of the age of AI

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence promises considerable economic benefits, even as it disrupts the world of work. Three priorities will help achieve good outcomes. This new article is by James Manyika and Jacques Bughin of the McKinsey Global Institute. I hope you find it useful. The time may have finally come for artificial intelligence (AI) after periods of hype followed by several "AI winters" over the past 60 years. AI now powers so many real-world applications, ranging from facial recognition to language translators and assistants like Siri and Alexa, that we barely notice it. Along with these consumer applications, companies across sectors are increasingly harnessing AI's power in their operations. Embracing AI promises considerable benefits for businesses and economies through its contributions to productivity growth and innovation.


The promise and challenge of the age of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

AI promises considerable economic benefits, even as it disrupts the world of work. These three priorities will help achieve good outcomes. The time may have finally come for artificial intelligence (AI) after periods of hype followed by several "AI winters" over the past 60 years. AI now powers so many real-world applications, ranging from facial recognition to language translators and assistants like Siri and Alexa, that we barely notice it. Along with these consumer applications, companies across sectors are increasingly harnessing AI's power in their operations. Embracing AI promises considerable benefits for businesses and economies through its contributions to productivity growth and innovation. At the same time, AI's impact on work is likely to be profound. Some occupations as well as demand for some skills will decline, while others grow and many change as people work alongside ever-evolving and increasingly capable machines.


Technology, jobs, and the future of work

#artificialintelligence

Automation, digital platforms, and other innovations are changing the fundamental nature of work. Understanding these shifts can help policy makers, business leaders, and workers move forward. The world of work is in a state of flux, which is causing considerable anxiety--and with good reason. There is growing polarization of labor-market opportunities between high- and low-skill jobs, unemployment and underemployment especially among young people, stagnating incomes for a large proportion of households, and income inequality. Migration and its effects on jobs has become a sensitive political issue in many advanced economies. And from Mumbai to Manchester, public debate rages about the future of work and whether there will be enough jobs to gainfully employ everyone.