Addicted to Anticipation - Issue 40: Learning

Nautilus

Catherine Townsend-Lyon, 53, started gambling excessively when she was 30. As a result, her 40th birthday wasn't much of a celebration: She was hospitalized, shortly after a suicide attempt. She'd tried to slit her wrists the day she'd missed her best friend's funeral, after stealing money from her job at a credit service to play the slot machines. That was just one part of how bad it had gotten. She would arrive at casinos at 7 a.m. and wear bladder control underpants. She didn't want to have to get up--even for a quick bathroom break--if she was on a winning streak.


When Exercise Becomes Too Much of a Good Thing - Facts So Romantic

Nautilus

In a world where only 1 in 5 American adults meet the minimum daily exercise requirements, exercise addiction can seem like the opposite of a problem. Don't let that fool you, says Marilyn Freimuth, a clinical psychologist at Fielding Graduate University, in Santa Barbara. "Exercise addiction can completely take over someone's life. They're getting injured, all they can do is think about exercising, but because our culture values physical activity," she says, "we overlook the issue." In their 2015 book The Truth About Exercise Addiction: Understanding the Dark Side of Thinspiration, author Katherine Schreiber and Jacksonville University professor of kinesiology Heather Hausenblas write, "Exercise addicts experience physical activity as both a coping mechanism and a compulsion without which they feel they cannot survive."


The digital drug: Internet addiction spawns innovative U.S. treatment programs

The Japan Times

CINCINNATI - When Danny Reagan was 13, he began exhibiting signs of what doctors usually associate with drug addiction. He became agitated, secretive and withdrew from friends. He had quit baseball and Boy Scouts, and he stopped doing homework and showering. But he was not using drugs. He was hooked on YouTube and video games, to the point where he could do nothing else.


What is sex addiction?

FOX News

Reports have revealed that actor Kevin Spacey checked himself into the same rehab center where movie mogul Harvey Weinstein is also allegedly seeking treatment for sex addiction. Fox News' Dr. Manny sits down with two psychologists to discuss what kind of help patients actually get at these expensive facilities and if they work.