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Useless Police Robot Fails to Call For Help When Needed

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If there was an emergency and you saw a police robot patrolling the area, a reasonable person would expect that simply pushing its emergency alert button would call for help. That's what a California woman reportedly tried to do. In reality, the robot told her to get out of the way and carried on with its business. According to NBC News, Cogo Guebara noticed the police robot when a fight broke out in the parking lot of Salt Lake Park. However, despite pressing the emergency alert button multiple times, the robot merely asked Guebara to step aside and continued to scoot along its preprogrammed path, occasionally telling people to keep the park clean.


Police Robot calls manufacturer instead of police officers -- Z6 Mag

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The Huntingdon Park police near Los Angeles has rolled out several robot police in public spaces around the city. However, reports and testimonies reveal that these autonomous police robots may not serve any purpose at all. The inefficiency of the supposed virtual police that secure the parks in Los Angeles (instead of actual human police officers) was highlighted when the Knightscope police robot ignored a distressed woman. A woman in a park near Los Angeles attempted to summon the futuristic police robot when a fight broke out in the area. Instead of responding to the distress call of the woman, the K5 model named "HP RoboCop," ignored her report and told her to "step out of the way," as earlier reported in NBC News.


Is the new officer policing your local beat actually a robot?

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Give us your feedback, and we'll help you learn more about where and how police security robots are being used This summer, the police department in Huntington Park, California debuted the newest member of its squad: A 400 pound autonomous robot developed by Knightscope Inc. The sleek "RoboCop" has gotten a fair amount of attention for its patrols of the local park, including a featured segment on NBC's "Today" show. MuckRock's JPat Brown, submitted a California Public Records Act request for materials related to the robot's use and, through a release earlier this month, found that the machine was equipped with the ability to scan and store license plate information and video footage, which it can then "analyze" for bystanders and potential criminals. MuckRock wants your help in learning more about how these machines are being used and acquired. The roving robot security guard has found employment with private companies, malls, casinos, and airports, but the use by official law enforcement is still in its earlier stages.



Security Robot Works At Intersection Of AI And Crime

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The future of policing is five feet tall and weighs about 400 pounds. Don't worry, it's not what you think. Knightscope calls its a fully autonomous data security machine. It is meant to augment security and law enforcement with the tools of modern information technology. K5 is not supposed to be a gun-toting Robocop.