The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow

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The US labor market looks markedly different today than it did two decades ago. It has been reshaped by dramatic events like the Great Recession but also by a quieter ongoing evolution in the mix and location of jobs. In the decade ahead, the next wave of automation technologies may accelerate the pace of change. Millions of jobs could be phased out even as new ones are created. More broadly, the day-to-day nature of work could change for nearly everyone as intelligent machines become fixtures in the American workplace. Until recently, most research on the potential effects of automation, including our own, has focused on the national-level effects. Our previous work ran multiple scenarios regarding the pace and extent of adoption. In the midpoint case, our modeling shows some jobs being phased out but sufficient numbers being added at the same time to produce net positive job growth for the United States as a whole through 2030.


The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow

#artificialintelligence

The US labor market looks markedly different today than it did two decades ago. It has been reshaped by dramatic events like the Great Recession but also by a quieter ongoing evolution in the mix and location of jobs. In the decade ahead, the next wave of automation technologies may accelerate the pace of change. Millions of jobs could be phased out even as new ones are created. More broadly, the day-to-day nature of work could change for nearly everyone as intelligent machines become fixtures in the American workplace. Until recently, most research on the potential effects of automation, including our own, has focused on the national-level effects. Our previous work ran multiple scenarios regarding the pace and extent of adoption. In the midpoint case, our modeling shows some jobs being phased out but sufficient numbers being added at the same time to produce net positive job growth for the United States as a whole through 2030.


Cities not ready for AI – even the world's smartest can't handle getting any smarter

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No city in the world is ready for the disruption that artificial intelligence (AI) will bring. This is the conclusion of a new review by management consultancy Oliver Wyman, which considers the readiness of 105 cities to cope with AI-inspired digital change, and finds even the smartest need to make urgent and "significant improvements". The study ranks cities on four criteria: the quality of their plan (defined as'vision'); their ability to execute on it ('activation'); the quality of their talent and infrastructure ('asset base'); and how the interplay of these last two, their activation and assets, impact their overall momentum ('trajectory'). Singapore is most prepared overall, the report says, with an average score of 75.8 out of 100 across the four criteria. But the review states no city is even close to being fully prepared.


Cities Need to Prepare Now for Disruption from Artificial Intelligence According to Oliver Wyman Forum Index

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NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--No city in the world is ready for the disruptions that will be brought on by the Age of AI. Significant improvements must be made by governments and private sector institutions to fully prepare for the challenges that lie ahead. This, according to a global study conducted by the Oliver Wyman Forum, which ranked 105 international cities in terms of their preparedness for the broad technological and digital disruption that will be spurred by AI and related technologies. The index ranks cities on four key criteria: the quality of a city's plan (Vision); a city's ability to execute on forward-looking plans (Activation); the extent and quality of talent, education, and infrastructure (Asset Base); and how the interplay of Activation and Asset Base are impacting its overall momentum (Trajectory). Singapore shows the most readiness overall, with an average score of 75.8 out of 100 across the four criteria.


Investment In Skills Is Key For Success In The Age Of AI - The Adecco Group

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New research from the Global Talent Competitiveness Index 2020 confirms that to succeed in the age of AI, more investment is needed in skills development and lifelong learning. While the emerging markets lag far behind the talent-rich nations, the gap can be bridged with the right set of policies. The currency of the AI-driven economy is talent. But while it is true that talent is high in demand, it is also short in supply. This especially rings true for the economies that fail to attract and build their own talented workforces.