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Facebook Live, Periscope have big U.S. political moment with House sit-in

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

House Democrats ended their sit-in on the floor of the House Thursday after more than 24-hours of chants and speeches advocating for stricter gun control measures. The time-honored way of watching democracy slowly unfold -- with the cable box set to C-SPAN and its wide-angled views of the House and Senate floors -- may be headed for the history books after millions tuned into Facebook and Periscope live-video streams to follow an overnight protest by House Democrats. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Facebook Live broadcasts by 19 members of Congress engaged in the sit-in protest were watched 3 million times. Facebook "Live is unfiltered and real," Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post Thursday. "It's bringing us moments we wouldn't see otherwise – from birthday parties to locker room celebrations to late-night sessions in the United States Capitol."


Facebook Live, Periscope have big political moment with House sit-in

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., center, joined by, from left, Rep. Paul Tonko, D-N.Y., House Assistant Minority Leader James Clyburn, of S.C., Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., and Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 23, 2016, after House Democrats ended their sit in protest on the House floor. The time-honored way of watching democracy slowly unfold -- with the cable box set to C-SPAN and its wide-angled views of the House and Senate floors -- may be headed for the history books after millions tuned into Facebook and Periscope live-video streams to follow an overnight protest by House Democrats. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Facebook Live broadcasts by 19 members of Congress engaged in the sit-in protest were watched 3 million times. Facebook "Live is unfiltered and real," Zuckerberg said in a Facebook post Thursday.


Periscope extends beyond phones as Twitter ups ante on video

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Twitter is taking the smartphone shackles off its live-video service Periscope in its latest attempt to broaden its audience. The Periscope Producer feature will let media companies and other users pipe live video feeds directly into Twitter, without using a smartphone to record the images. Since its debut early last year, Periscope had been confined to live video feeds taken on a smartphone. Lauren Simo, left, answers questions during a weekly forum streamed via Periscope on the smartphone of Toby Srebnik, Fish Consulting director of social media, at the company's offices in Hollywood, Fla. Twitter is taking the smartphone shackles off its live-video service Periscope as part of the struggling company¿s attempt to broaden its audience. During Producer's testing phase last week, a Florida television station showing live video on its website used the new tool to redistribute the same feeds on Twitter.


2016 was the year that Facebook tried to take over the world

Engadget

Facebook had a busy 2016. It introduced chatbots to Messenger, repositioned Instagram as a Snapchat competitor and helped make virtual reality mainstream with Oculus. But as all of that was going on, Facebook also became one of the most powerful media companies on the planet. As more than a billion people flocked to the site for news, its influence on the world stage is undeniable. With live video, the Presidential election and the fake news scandal that followed, Facebook's impact was more evident in 2016 than ever before.


Chewbacca mask video star visits Facebook

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

SAN FRANCISCO -- Candace Payne, whose peals of infectious laughter as she tried on an electronic Chewbacca mask, made her an overnight Internet sensation has a new claim to fame. The broadcast which she streamed live from her car parked outside a department store while wearing a T-shirt with the Death Star and the caption "Epic fail," racked up 141 million views, making it the most watched Facebook Live video ever. And, on Tuesday, that feat earned Payne a trip to Facebook's Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters. "We had a fun surprise for her!" Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a post showing Payne frolicking around the Facebook campus with Chewbacca. The force has certainly been with Payne, of Grand Prairie, Tex., who bought the Star Wars mask at Kohl's department store with a gift card she received for her 37th birthday.