Could artificial intelligence replace doctors? AI is now diagnosing this common eye disease

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Artificial intelligence is now being used to diagnose a common eye disease. The device, called IDx-DR, uses software and a retinal camera to take images of a patient's retina. It then uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to evaluate the images and effectively diagnose diabetic retinopathy, a diabetes complication that can lead to blindness. Developers hope this new device will make it easier for patients to get diagnosed outside of a clinical environment, leading perhaps to catching the condition earlier. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics became the first to use the new technology in June, according to reports from The Gazette newspaper.


Artificial Intelligence Is Now Diagnosing Disease

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Artificial intelligence is now being used to diagnose a common eye disease. The device, called IDx-DR, uses software and a retinal camera to take images of a patient's retina. It then uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to evaluate the images and effectively diagnose diabetic retinopathy, a diabetes complication that can lead to blindness. Developers hope this new device will make it easier for patients to get diagnosed outside of a clinical environment, leading perhaps to catching the condition earlier. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics became the first to use the new technology in June, according to reports from The Gazette newspaper.


Artificial intelligence begins diagnosing patients in Eastern Iowa

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Federal cuts limit Iowa's access to health insurance enrollment services CORALVILLE -- The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics has become the first to employ new technology -- developed by a company rooted in the university's research engine -- that uses artificial intelligence to diagnose an eye disease. On June 12, the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center at UI Health Care-Iowa River Landing in Coralville began using technology developed by IDx, the Coralville-based medical diagnostics company. The device, which received approval from U.S. Food and Drug Administration in April, was developed to diagnose diabetic retinopathy, a diabetes complication that can cause blindness. Called IDx-DR, the device uses software and a retinal camera to take images of a patient's retina. From there, the AI analyzes the patient's images "the same way I do as a clinician" to determine if the patient has the condition, said Dr. Michael Abramoff, president and director of IDx and UI Health Care ophthalmologist.


This AI screening tool for diabetic retinopathy makes a decision, not a recommendation - MedCity News

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Artificial intelligence is a healthcare and technology buzzword right now, but IDx Founder and President Michael Abràmoff is not a Johnny-come-lately to this phenomenon. His journey and that of the company's lead product began over two decades ago in the Netherlands.


FDA Approves Artificial Intelligence-Based Device to Detect Certain Diabetes-Related Eye Problems

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The FDA has permitted marketing of IDx-DR (IDx LLC)--the first medical device to use artificial intelligence to detect greater than a mild level of the eye disease diabetic retinopathy in adults who have diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when high levels of blood sugar lead to damage in the blood vessels of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue in the back of the eye. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among the more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults. "Early detection of retinopathy is an important part of managing care for the millions of people with diabetes, yet many patients with diabetes are not adequately screened for diabetic retinopathy since about 50% of them do not see their eye doctor on a yearly basis," said Malvina Eydelman, MD, Director of the Division of Ophthalmic, and Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices at the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "Today's decision permits the marketing of a novel artificial intelligence technology that can be used in a primary care doctor's office.