Development of Secure Embedded Systems Coursera

@machinelearnbot

Three people died after the crash landing of an Asiana Airlines aircraft from Seoul, Korea, at San Fransisco International Airport (SFO) on July 6, 2013. The American National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) established that the crash most probably was caused by the flight crew's (in)actions. Three teenage girls lost their lives; two in the airplane and another was accidentally run over by a firetruck. The human factor is often cause for accidents. NTSB and others report that more than 50 percent of plane crashes is caused by pilot error (and for road accidents it is even 90 perc.)


Uber India to introduce real-time facial recognition feature for drivers

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Uber India will introduce its facial recognition-based Real Time ID check feature for its India app in Mumbai, New Delhi, Bengaluru, Hyderabad and Kolkata, with more cities to follow soon, according to a report by Tech 2. Real Time ID check prompts drivers to take a selfie before they access the app or accepts a ride, which is then matched with their photo stored on Uber's servers. If the images do not match, the driver's account will be temporarily suspended as the matter is investigated. The security measure is intended to ensure that driver's biometric details are constantly being scrutinized while preventing drivers and their accounts from being compromised by fraudsters. In addition, the feature reassures passengers that the Uber driver on the app is, in fact, the same person who is picking them up. "This prevents fraud and protects drivers' accounts from being compromised," said Joe Sullivan, chief security officer at Uber. "It also protects riders by building another layer of accountability into the app to ensure the right person is behind the wheel.


Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care

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WASHINGTON, DC (March 8, 2017)--Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting. The researchers used cutting-edge artificial intelligence to create a "chatbot" interventional radiologist that can automatically communicate with referring clinicians and quickly provide evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions. This allows the referring physician to provide real-time information to the patient about the next phase of treatment, or basic information about an interventional radiology treatment. "We theorized that artificial intelligence could be used in a low-cost, automated way in interventional radiology as a way to improve patient care," said Edward W. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and one of the authors of the study. "Because artificial intelligence has already begun transforming many industries, it has great potential to also transform health care."


Whirlpool plugs Alexa and Google Assistant into its appliances

Engadget

Whirlpool's smart appliances have already had some voice assistant control, but they're about become particularly AI-savvy. The company has unveiled a 2018 lineup where many appliances support both Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant, letting you control most of your home using the smart speaker (or mobile app) you prefer. You can check the time left on the washing machine, start the dishwasher or change the temperature of your fridge without lifting a finger.


Future-focused: Stop thinking in the past and get ahead of the unexpected with IoT - Internet of Things

@machinelearnbot

One June day in Virginia last year, an airplane was grounded by an unlikely adversary: a large swarm of bees. The peculiar story made for great newspaper headlines and serves as a reminder that even with the best technology and planning, some things are truly unexpected. But fortunately, most aircraft delays are caused by far more predictable issues than an unwelcome swarm of bees nesting in a turbine. Airlines, like most asset-intensive businesses, are getting increasingly better at predicting failures and anticipating maintenance problems. Rather than keeping planes grounded for costly and annoying last-minute maintenance -- or, worse, exposing passengers to the risk of flying on a faulty aircraft -- airlines are investing in cutting-edge technology that detects potential problems before they arise.