Half of U.S. adults are profiled in police facial recognition databases

PCWorld

Photographs of nearly half of all U.S. adults--117 million people--are collected in police facial recognition databases across the country with little regulation over how the networks are searched and used, according to a new study. Along with a lack of regulation, critics question the accuracy of facial recognition algorithms. Meanwhile, state, city, and federal facial recognition databases include 48 percent of U.S. adults, said the report from the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law. The search of facial recognition databases is largely unregulated, the report said. "A few agencies have instituted meaningful protections to prevent the misuse of the technology," its authors wrote.


Half of US adults are profiled in police facial recognition databases

PCWorld

Photographs of nearly half of all U.S. adults -- 117 million people -- are collected in police facial recognition databases across the country with little regulation over how the networks are searched and used, according to a new study. Along with a lack of regulation, critics question the accuracy of facial recognition algorithms. Meanwhile, state, city, and federal facial recognition databases include 48 percent of U.S. adults, said the report from the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law. The search of facial recognition databases is largely unregulated, the report said. "A few agencies have instituted meaningful protections to prevent the misuse of the technology," its authors wrote.


U. of C. researchers use data to predict police misconduct

#artificialintelligence

In two Loop office buildings about eight blocks apart, a pair of University of Chicago research teams are analyzing big data to answer a thorny question that has become especially charged in recent months: Will a police officer have an adverse interaction with a citizen? The team from the university's Crime Lab is in the first stages of working with the Chicago Police Department to build a predictive data program to improve the department's Early Intervention System, which is designed to determine if an officer is likely to engage in aggressive, improper conduct with a civilian. The other team, part of U. of C.'s Center for Data Science & Public Policy, is expected to launch a data-driven pilot of an Early Intervention System with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department in North Carolina by the end of the summer. The center is working on similar efforts with the Los Angeles County sheriff's office and the Nashville and Knoxville police departments in Tennessee. Data crunching has been used in policing since the late 1970s.


Dutch police crack encrypted communications network

Boston Herald

Dutch police and prosecutors took down an encrypted communications network Tuesday believed to have been used by criminals in the Netherlands and possibly overseas. Prosecutors said in a statement that they arrested a 36-year-old man in the eastern city of Nijmegen who is suspected of money laundering. He is the owner of a company which allegedly "provided criminals with customized smartphones and accompanying communication services." The company sold mobile phones for 1,500 euros ( 1,700) that had been protected with legal encryption software called Pretty Good Privacy, or PGP, and could be used only for email, said cybercrime prosecutor Martijn Egberts. "You pay a very high price for a phone you can't make calls on," cybercrime prosecutor Martijn Egberts said in a telephone interview.


How To Hack The Police: Vigilante Hacker Publishes Online Tutorial Video

International Business Times

The hacker responsible for leaking 400GB of data from Italian spyware firm Hacking Team has published a tutorial video showing those seeking to follow in his footsteps how to hack a police website. Known variously as Phineas Fisher, GammaGroupPR and Hack Back, the anonymous hacker published the video on YouTube showing how he hacked the website of the Catalan Police Union or Sindicat De Mossos d'Esquadra (SME). The hacker is seen obtaining data, including police officers' names, bank details and badge numbers -- all of which he has since dumped online. YouTube removed the video as it violated the company's policies but the hacker has published several mirrors of the video elsewhere online and while some have been taken offline, at least one remains live at the time of publication. Phineas Fisher rose to prominence in July 2015 when he published a huge trove of data, including company emails and documents as well as the source code of the company's intrusive spying tools on the internet, revealing details of which governments and law enforcement agencies the company was working with, including the FBI, Drug Enforcement Agency and Department of Defense.