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Still in law school? Artificial intelligence begins to take over legal work - The College Fix

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For those thinking of law school, keep in mind that technology may revolutionize the profession before you earn that J.D. In the research-driven, labor-intensive legal profession, the age-old question of man vs. machine is being answered as some law firms have begun to use an "artificially intelligent attorney" to research and hash out legal issues – a trend that legal minds predict will displace some human lawyers. Called ROSS, the robot lawyer uses IBM's cognitive computer program Watson to learn from experience to gain speed when answering legal questions, according to its creators. It can read through the entire body of law to return a cited answer, monitor the law to recognize other court decisions that could affect the case at hand, and even glean conclusions from more than one billion legal documents per second, they add. Its creation comes on the heels of a 2014 analysis that predicted artificial intelligence will cause "structural collapse" of law firms by 2030. As for the robo-lawyer, one law professor said the technology will displace some workers.


How AI will impact the Legal profession

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If you have recently received a parking ticket, you can use the services of a robot lawyer to help. The robot lawyer asks as series of questions like where the ticket was issued, a description of what happened and within a few minutes, you can have a 500-word letter to send to the city to contest the parking ticket. This bot lawyer has, so far, helped overturn more than 200,000 parking tickets. If you are looking at getting a divorce, wevorce can help. Wevorce's web-based platform allows couples to go through a collaborative divorce -- one in which both partners work together to decide how to split assets and figure out how to coparent.


Artificial Intelligence Is on the Case in the Legal Profession

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AI robot lawyers are here--and they aren't going away. When you hear the phrase "robot lawyer," what comes to mind? My brain conjures up an image of C-3PO in a three-piece suit, shuffling around a courtroom, while throwing out cross-examination quips such as: "Don't call me a mindless philosopher, you overweight glob of prosecuting witness grease!" Artificial intelligence (AI) is, in fact, becoming a mainstay component of the legal profession. In some circumstances, this analytics-crunching technology is using algorithms and machine learning to do work that was previously done by entry-level lawyers.


Artificial Intelligence Is on the Case in the Legal Profession

#artificialintelligence

AI robot lawyers are here--and they aren't going away. When you hear the phrase "robot lawyer," what comes to mind? My brain conjures up an image of C-3PO in a three-piece suit, shuffling around a courtroom, while throwing out cross-examination quips such as: "Don't call me a mindless philosopher, you overweight glob of prosecuting witness grease!" Artificial intelligence (AI) is, in fact, becoming a mainstay component of the legal profession. In some circumstances, this analytics-crunching technology is using algorithms and machine learning to do work that was previously done by entry-level lawyers.


BakerHostetler Hires A.I. Lawyer, Ushers In The Legal Apocalypse

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When Jeopardy superchampion Ken Jennings fell to IBM's Watson, a chill fell over the ranks of white-collar professionals who saw the cold, merciless grip of technology tightening its grip around their hearts just as surely as the steam hammer did in John Henry. Lawyers in particular recognized that the slayer of the Jennings dragon wasn't destined to stalk syndicated television, making Alex Trebek's contestant chit-chat, almost improbably, more stilted and awkward. No, Watson was coming for our jobs. As much as lawyers lionize themselves in the media -- pointing to the tenacity of Jack McCoy, the soaring oratory of Jake Brigance, and… whatever the hell those How To Get Away With Murder morons are doing -- deep down lawyers know that the bulk of the profession involves document review, rote agreement-drafting tasks, and data mining caselaw. We make human drones do this work now, why not shift some of the work to the electronic brain?