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Mashable

Durian is a spiny Asian fruit that emits a distinct odor, which many people find offensive. Some say it smells like rotting trash, others say it smells like "dick cheese." The fruit isn't very common in America, so many people are completely unfamiliar with the its reputation. Using this to their advantage, Cut Video decided to give the fruit to 100 people, and have them give it a whirl for the first time. Reactions were nearly unanimous -- durian is gross.


What you need to know about fruit tea

BBC News

Their investigation, published in the British Dental Journal, also found it's not just what you eat, but how and when you eat it, that contributes to the risk of developing the condition.


Can you really grow enough fruit and veg to be self-sufficient?

New Scientist

Grow your own fruit and veg!" promised a headline on my feed. According to another, "Thousands of families are planning to become more self-sufficient" as "millions take up the Good Life". "Try sprouting seeds, aka microgreens, like alfalfa, broccoli, amaranth and wheatgrass on wet kitchen roll." Urged on by a slew of such suggestions, unprecedented demand for fruit and veg seeds (up as much as 1800 per cent year-on-year) has caused many online sellers to freeze all new orders and set up long waiting lists.


Chinese company grows fruit into bizarre shapes

Daily Mail - Science & tech

These ingenious moulds grow fruit and veg into bizarre shapes - including little Buddha pears and square watermelons. China-based Fruit Mould Co is behind the crazy contraptions and have been commissioned worldwide to help people make odd-shaped produce. Its website says: 'Fruit Mould Co., Ltd specialises in creating one of a kind, high quality fruit and vegetable moulds to transform regular fruits into wacky and weird shapes that you've never seen before. 'Imagine square watermelons, heart-shaped cucumbers and Buddha shaped pears.' The moulds work by farmers placing them over the stems of growing produce and then allowing the fruit and veg to slowly fill them as they develop.