Arctic Sea Ice Melting: Climate Change Means It Could All Be Gone In Two Years

International Business Times

Arctic sea ice may disappear much sooner than previously predicted and that melting could lead to dire consequences for the planet. The new predictions come from Arctic sea ice expert Dr. Peter Wadhams, a professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University in the United Kindom who wrote a book on the subject. Wadhams predicts that sea ice could disappear within two years, according to media reports over the weekend. Arctic sea ice melting does more than just add volume to our Earth's oceans and waterways. Ice, which is a bright surface, reflects the Sun's rays back into space instead of absorbing the heat and trapping it.


Melting Greenland ice now source of 25% of sea level rise, researchers say

The Japan Times

PARIS – Ocean levels rose 50 percent faster in 2014 than in 1993, with meltwater from the Greenland ice sheet now supplying 25 percent of total sea level increase compared with just 5 percent 20 years earlier, researchers reported Monday. The findings add to growing concern among scientists that the global watermark is climbing more rapidly than forecast only a few years ago, with potentially devastating consequences. Hundreds of millions of people around the world live in low-lying deltas that are vulnerable, especially when rising seas are combined with land sinking due to depleted water tables, or a lack of ground-forming silt held back by dams. Major coastal cities are also threatened, while some small island states are already laying plans for the day their drowning nations will no longer be livable. "This result is important because the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)" -- the U.N. science advisory body -- "makes a very conservative projection of total sea level rise by the end of the century," at 60 to 90 cm (24 to 35 inches), said Peter Wadhams, a professor of ocean physics at the University of Oxford who did not take part in the research.


Antarctic and Arctic Sea Ice Levels At Record Lows

U.S. News

He said that global sea ice is retreating at an unprecedented speed, with ice at the Antarctic running at its lowest ever levels for this time of year since records began.


Cambridge scientists are building a new research centre to develop radical ways to 'save the Earth'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The University of Cambridge is building a radical new centre designed to explore potential ways of fighting climate change. The Centre for Climate Repair will explore radical geoengineering schemes designed to directly tackle the effects of climate change. Among such schemes being considered are the spraying of salt into clouds in order to make them reflect more warming sunlight back into space. Others imagine the extraction of atmospheric carbon dioxide for use as fuel, or ocean fertilisation to get more of the gas taken up by the seas. The University of Cambridge's is building a Centre for Climate Repair to explore radical solutions to combat humanity's harmful changes to the Earth's climate (stock image) The research lab is being planned in response to fears that our current approaches to minimise the emission of harmful greenhouse gases will not be enough on their own to prevent catastrophic and irreversible changes to the Earth's climate.


Rate of global sea level rise increased by 50% since 1990

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The rise in global sea levels has accelerated since the 1990s amid rising temperatures, according to a new study. The annual rate of sea level rise has increased by 50 per cent to 3.3 millimetres each year in 2014 from 2.2 millimetres each year in 1993. Researchers hope the findings will act as a'major warning' about the dangers of sea level rise for centuries if global warming isn't stopped. The rise in global sea levels has accelerated since the 1990s amid rising temperatures, according to a new study. The annual rate of sea level rise has increased by 50 per cent to 3.3 millimetres each year in 2014 from 2.2 millimetres each year in 1993 Sea levels have risen by about 20 centimetres in the past century and many scientific studies project a steady acceleration this century as man-made global warming melts more ice on land.