The most talked-about brands of 2017

#artificialintelligence

In the aftermath of the U.S. Presidential election and the numerous terrorist attacks around the globe, the social media giant received criticism for hosting fake news and advertisements, as well as extremist content on its platform. We identified they were stuck with this issue right after the election. In the middle of the year, the company reached a new milestone of 2 billion monthly active users.


Netflix CEO: co-workers were affected by Trump travel ban

Boston Herald

Netflix employees were personally affected by U.S. President Donald Trump's attempt to ban people entering from seven Muslim countries, the company's CEO said Tuesday. Reed Hastings has been a critic of the temporary travel ban, which Trump hopes to revive in a revised form this week, and told The Associated Press on Tuesday that some of his co-workers had gotten caught up in it. "We had Iranian and Iraqi employees who were unable to come to work," he said on the sidelines of the Mobile World Congress, the wireless industry's biggest annual gathering held in Barcelona, Spain. Netflix was among dozens of tech companies that publicly opposed the travel ban out of fear that it would stifle innovation. U.S. politics has become as gripping as a TV drama but Hastings says that Netflix, the distributor of the show "House of Cards," is not planning a show based on Trump.


NBC KO's Trump troll doll

FOX News

Crowdfunding is a fantastic way to gauge public interest for a product, with Internet users validating ideas with their hard-earned cash. Former Disney sculptor Chuck Williams is a prime example of giving the people what they want, with his Kickstarter campaign aimed at turning President Donald Trump into a Troll doll quadrupling its goal in the first week alone. After Mr Williams debuted a naked Troll-doll version of Trump on Facebook back in early February, his 12 cm-tall doll was met with praise. A subsequent Kickstarter campaign to mass-produce the Trump mockery was chasing $38,000 to cover the cost of bulk manufacturing the doll. Much to his surprise, the project attracted 3,621 backers and received over $160,000.


Tariffs and new streamers will cost you in 2019

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

This was "Streaming Week," and the action took place in New York, where Disney, Warner Media and others gave ad buyers and the media community a sneak peek at what's coming down the pike. That would be more subscription services, with programming that used to appear elsewhere – like "The Office" on Netflix – moving to the new ones and more requests for you to spend more money to watch TV. This was also the week President Donald Trump doubled down on his trade war with China, announcing higher tariffs that threaten to add 25% or more to the cost of electronic devices and other products produced in China. These would go into effect on June 25. The list of some 3,805 products includes popular everyday items like laptops, tablets and TVs.


Univision anchor Jorge Ramos reveals Venezuela's Maduro became upset over questions about torture and if he is a dictator

FOX News

Ramos, Univision staffers detained at presidential palace in Venezuela. Jorge Ramos, the star anchor of the Spanish-language television network Univision, has described in detail how his tough interview with Venezuela's disputed president Nicolas Maduro landed him in detention. In a video posted on the Facebook page of his web program, "Real American with Jorge Ramos," the anchor, who was released after two hours, said Maduro was upset with questions about fraudulent elections, harassment and violence against peaceful protesters. He was also asked whether his title should really be "dictator". Ramos, often gulping and looking away from what Univision later said was a borrowed cell phone at the Caracas hotel where he'd returned after his release, said the last straw for Maduro was when the Mexican-American journalist held up his iPad and showed him footage he had filmed himself of three children on the streets of Venezuela rummaging through the back of a garbage truck for scraps of food.