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Who gets to be the voice inside your meditation app?

Mashable

March Mindfulness is a Mashable series that explores the intersection of meditation practice and technology. Because even in the time of coronavirus, March doesn't have to be madness. Get yourself into a comfortable position. Whose voice did you hear these words in? If you use meditation apps on the regular, you've got a particular person in your mind right now. Whether your chosen app is helmed by one signature voice or offers up to 10,000, voice is an important element of a meditation app. The voice becomes your link to developing mindfulness, your intimate guide to building tactical tools to help you navigate life's ups and downs, and the key to you actually returning the next day for another session.


How to care for your voice in case you're yelling this weekend

PBS NewsHour

This Friday, an estimated 800,000 people will descend on Washington, D.C., for President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration ceremony. A day later, protesters plan to join the fray at the Women's March. One bridge will unite the supporters and naysayers alike: full-throated yelling. When the dust settles, many may complain of hoarse voices, but why? Your vocal cords are mostly muscle.


How to Create Your Own Synthetic Voice With Just One Hour of Speech (Lyrebird Review) Lionbridge AI

#artificialintelligence

With deepfakes receiving a lot of media coverage recently, synthetic media is a trending topic among AI forums and a growing area of machine learning. The possible threats posed by manipulated or synthetic media has caught the attention of government officials and even led to a House of Representatives hearing in June of 2019. Like every new and emerging technology, synthetic media comes with risks. However, companies like Lyrebird are proof that the positive applications of synthetic media outweigh the negative. From chatbots to virtual assistants, research in ASR and higher-quality audio training data have led to some of the most useful tech of the current generation.


AI And Creativity Update: A Voice Double Conversation Featuring Joanna Penn And Mark Leslie Lefebvre

#artificialintelligence

In mid-2019, I shared 9 Ways That Artificial Intelligence Might Disrupt Authors and Publishing, and one of those possible disruptions concerned voice technologies, which I also wrote about in Audio for Authors. In 2020, we have seen an acceleration of AI with the release of GPT-3 for natural language processing and generation, as well as the development of ever more sophisticated voice recognition and creation. In this episode, Mark Leslie Lefebvre and I share a conversation between our Voice Doubles and our thoughts on the ramifications. You can get your own Voice Double at Descript.com. You can find Mark at MarkLeslie.ca. Mark also recorded a special episode with more of his thoughts in episode 148 of Stark Reflections. We'd love to know what you think so please leave a comment or tweet me @thecreativepenn and Mark @markleslie So, how's lockdown where you are? How are things in Canada? Mark: Lockdown has actually allowed me to discover new types of creativity in myself, where I seem to have prevented myself from writing prose. So I have the energy inside me to tell story, to want to share and amuse and entertain, and I redirected it into a different output that satisfied that part of my soul that needs to write, and now I'm back writing again. But while I was struggling, it was really good to have that outlet. Jo: I also struggled at the beginning, and I did a flurry of business activities.


How To Start A Small Business During Pandemic - 3 Ways to Record and Publish Your Online Course

#artificialintelligence

In this tutorial, I want to talk to you about the 3 best ways to record and publish your online course. By the time we are through, you will have learned about three ways to record and publish your online content in order to boost viewer numbers and customer experience. The first way to record and publish your online course is through PowerPoint or Keynote and VoiceOver. This technique is simple, cheap, and great for camera-shy people. First, make your PowerPoint or Keynote presentation as normal.