Tech Trends 2019: Executive summary

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Looking back, we can see the value these emerging innovations offered, but in the moment, their promise seemed less clear. It is, therefore, remarkable how quickly organizations across sectors and regions navigated through the so what and into the now what for these trends and went on to successfully traverse the new digital landscape. This journey from uncertainty to digital transformation informs our latest offering, Tech Trends 2019: Beyond the digital frontier. A persistent theme of every Tech Trends report has been the increasing, often mind-bending velocity of change. A decade ago many companies could achieve competitive advantage by embracing innovations and trends that were already underway. Today, this kind of reactive approach is no longer enough. To stay ahead of the game, companies must work methodically to sense new innovations and possibilities, make sense of their ambitions for tomorrow, and find the confidence to boldly go beyond the digital frontier. So here's to the next decade of opportunity, whatever it may be. Along the way, embrace that queasy feeling of uncertainty.


State of AI in the Enterprise, 2nd Edition

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FOR the second straight year, Deloitte surveyed executives in the US knowledgeable about cognitive technologies and artificial intelligence,1 representing companies that are testing and implementing them today. We found that these early adopters2 remain bullish on cognitive technologies' value. As in last year's survey, the level of support for AI is truly extraordinary. These findings illustrate that cognitive technologies hold enticing promise, some of which is being fulfilled today. However, AI technologies may deliver their best returns when companies balance excitement over their potential with the ability to execute. A year later, and the thrill isn't gone. In Deloitte's 2017 cognitive survey, we were struck by early adopters' enthusiasm for cognitive technologies.4 That excitement owed much to the returns they said cognitive technologies were generating: 83 percent stated they were seeing either "moderate" or "substantial" benefits. Respondents also said they expected that cognitive technologies would change both their companies and their industries rapidly. In 2018, respondents remain enthusiastic about the value cognitive technologies bring. Their companies are investing in foundational cognitive capabilities, and using them with more skill. Thirty-seven percent of respondents say their companies have invested US$5 million or more in cognitive technologies. Another reason is that companies have more ways to acquire cognitive capabilities, and they are taking advantage.


No-collar workforce: Humans and machines in one loop--collaborating in roles and new talent models

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With intelligent automation marching steadily toward broader adoption, media coverage of this historic technology disruption is turning increasingly alarmist. "New study: Artificial intelligence is coming for your jobs, millennials,"1 announced one business news outlet recently. "US workers face higher risk of being replaced by robots,"2 declared another. These dire headlines may deliver impressive click stats, but they don't consider a much more hopeful--and likely--scenario: In the near future, human workers and machines will work together seamlessly, each complementing the other's efforts in a single loop of productivity. And, in turn, HR organizations will begin developing new strategies and tools for recruiting, managing, and training a hybrid human-machine workforce. Notwithstanding sky-is-falling predictions, robotics, cognitive, and artificial intelligence (AI) will probably not displace most human workers. Yes, these tools offer opportunities to automate some repetitive low-level tasks. Perhaps more importantly, intelligent automation solutions may be able to augment human performance by automating certain parts of a task, thus freeing individuals to focus on more "human" aspects that require empathic problem-solving abilities, social skills, and emotional intelligence. For example, if retail banking transactions were automated, bank tellers would be able to spend more time interacting with and advising customers--and selling products.


Digital Labor & Human Capital - Texas CEO Magazine

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Seven out of ten corporate executives say they are making significantly more investments in artificial intelligence (AI) than just two years ago, according to Accenture's recent Technology Vision survey. And more than half say they plan to use machine learning and embedded AI solutions extensively. The race toward a digital future has begun and within the next five years, mastering the impact of this technology on future strategy will be a critical task for every CEO. Computational speed, machine learning and natural user interfaces have all advanced to the point where computers can do jobs that, previously, only humans could do. Intelligent digital labor is set to spark a radical change in labor dynamics, with research from market analyst firm, Gartner, suggesting that by 2030, virtual talent spending will exceed 10 percent of human staff costs.


120 AI Predictions For 2019

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Me: "Alexa, tell me what will happen in 2019." Amazon AI: "Do you want to open'this day in history'?" Me: "Alexa, give me a prediction for 2019." Amazon AI: "The crystal ball is clouded, I can't tell." My conversation with Amazon's "smart speaker" or "intelligent voice assistant" just about sums up the present state of "artificial intelligence" (AI) at home, the office, and the factory: Try a few times and sooner or later you will probably get the correct action the human intelligence behind it programmed it to perform. What will be the state of AI in 2019? The following list features 120 senior executives involved with AI, all peering into their not-so-clouded crystal ball, and promising less hype and more practical, precise, and narrow AI. "Self-Driving Finance is a practical implementation of AI that is already used in one form or another by millions of bank customers around the globe and will only get better in the coming years. Based on projects that are currently underway with ...