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Ensemble Learning to Improve Machine Learning Results

#artificialintelligence

Ensemble learning helps improve machine learning results by combining several models. This approach allows the production of better predictive performance compared to a single model. That is why ensemble methods placed first in many prestigious machine learning competitions, such as the Netflix Competition, KDD 2009, and Kaggle. The Statsbot team wanted to give you the advantage of this approach and asked a data scientist, Vadim Smolyakov, to dive into three basic ensemble learning techniques. Ensemble methods are meta-algorithms that combine several machine learning techniques into one predictive model in order to decrease variance (bagging), bias (boosting), or improve predictions (stacking).


Ensemble Learning to Improve Machine Learning Results

#artificialintelligence

Ensemble methods are meta-algorithms that combine several machine learning techniques into one predictive model in order to decrease variance (bagging), bias (boosting), or improve predictions (stacking). Ensemble learning helps improve machine learning results by combining several models. This approach allows the production of better predictive performance compared to a single model. That is why ensemble methods placed first in many prestigious machine learning competitions, such as the Netflix Competition, KDD 2009, and Kaggle. The Statsbot team wanted to give you the advantage of this approach and asked a data scientist, Vadim Smolyakov, to dive into three basic ensemble learning techniques.


Want to Win at Kaggle? Pay Attention to Your Ensembles.

@machinelearnbot

The Kaggle competitions are like formula racing for data science. Winners edge out competitors at the fourth decimal place and like Formula 1 race cars, not many of us would mistake them for daily drivers. The amount of time devoted and the sometimes extreme techniques wouldn't be appropriate in a data science production environment, but like paddle shifters and exotic suspensions, some of those improvement find their way into day-to-day life. Ensembles, or teams of predictive models working together, have been the core strategy for winning at Kaggle. They've been around for a long time but they are getting better.


How to Develop a Random Subspace Ensemble With Python

#artificialintelligence

Random Subspace Ensemble is a machine learning algorithm that combines the predictions from multiple decision trees trained on different subsets of columns in the training dataset. Randomly varying the columns used to train each contributing member of the ensemble has the effect of introducing diversity into the ensemble and, in turn, can lift performance over using a single decision tree. It is related to other ensembles of decision trees such as bootstrap aggregation (bagging) that creates trees using different samples of rows from the training dataset, and random forest that combines ideas from bagging and the random subspace ensemble. Although decision trees are often used, the general random subspace method can be used with any machine learning model whose performance varies meaningfully with the choice of input features. In this tutorial, you will discover how to develop random subspace ensembles for classification and regression.


Ensemble Learning: Bagging & Boosting

#artificialintelligence

The bias and variance tradeoff is one of the key concerns when working with machine learning algorithms. Fortunately there are some Ensemble Learning based techniques that machine learning practitioners can take advantage of in order to tackle the bias and variance tradeoff, these techniques are bagging and boosting. Bagging or Bootstrap Aggregation was formally introduced by Leo Breiman in 1996 [3]. Bagging is an Ensemble Learning technique which aims to reduce the error learning through the implementation of a set of homogeneous machine learning algorithms. The key idea of bagging is the use of multiple base learners which are trained separately with a random sample from the training set, which through a voting or averaging approach, produce a more stable and accurate model.