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Experts slam the use of forehead-scanning thermometers to screen for Covid-19

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Leading doctors have warned against the use of infrared thermometers that scan a person's forehead to check for coronavirus infection. Such technology was widely deployed by shops, restaurants and workplaces as a form of screening to spot signs of fever, one of the main symptoms of Covid-19. But Dr William Wright at the Johns Hopkins University and Dr Philip Mackowiak, Emeritus, professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, have questioned their accuracy, and rubbished claims the devices are an effective tool in preventing the spread of Covid-19. In an editorial article published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases entitled'Why Temperature Screening for COVID-19 with Non-Contact Infrared Thermometers Doesn't Work', the world-leading experts assessed data on the technology. The equipment was widespread at the start of the pandemic, as little was known about the disease except it often manifested itself as a fever and a dry cough.


Can thermal cameras help spot coronavirus?

BBC News

As lockdowns ease, thermal imaging cameras are popping up in all sorts of public places to assess the state of people's health. Using infrared technology, thermal cameras detect radiating heat from a body - usually from the forehead - and then estimate core body temperature. These cameras are an extremely powerful tool, often deployed by fire fighters to track smouldering embers and police to search for out-of-sight suspects. But they are not designed to be medical devices. So how useful are they in the current pandemic?


The best thermometer for kids and adults

Engadget

This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a buyer's guide to the best homewares. When readers choose to buy The Sweethome's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. After doing more than 10 hours of research, interviewing three experts, and spending an extraordinary amount of time sitting with a thermometer under our tongues, we found the two best thermometers for at-home use. If you're looking for an oral/rectal/axillary thermometer, our top pick is the Vicks Comfort Flex Digital. If you're looking for an ear or forehead thermometer, we recommend the dual-function iProven forehead and ear DMT-489.


The best probe thermometer

Engadget

This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter, reviews for the real world. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. After spending 12 hours testing probe thermometers and speaking with experts--including cookbook authors, chefs, butchers, and a New York City Department of Health employee--we think most cooks just need a regular meat thermometer. But if you're set on getting a probe thermometer to measure the temperature of food while it cooks, we recommend the ThermoWorks Dot. In our tests, the Dot was the fastest and most accurate at reading temperatures.


The best probe thermometer

Engadget

This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and Engadget may earn affiliate commission. After spending 20 hours testing probe thermometers and speaking with experts--including cookbook authors, chefs, butchers, and a New York City Department of Health employee--we think most cooks just need a regular meat thermometer. But if you're set on getting a probe thermometer to measure the temperature of food while it cooks, we recommend the ThermoWorks Dot. In our tests, the Dot was the fastest and most accurate at reading temperatures. Its simple design and straightforward controls made it easier to use than the competition. The ThermoWorks Dot is accurate, affordable, and easy to use.